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Manistee & Grand Rapids Railroad

Manistee and Grand Rapids Railroad

The Manistee and Grand Rapids is one of the four railroads entering Manistee, and like the others has its terminus here. This road was organized on November 18, 1889, with a capital stock of $1,000,000, and was at first operated as a logging road. The strategic position of the line, however, extending as it does seventy miles to the south-east from Manistee, and shortening the distance to points south, east and west has brought the Manistee and Grand Rapids rapidly to the front as a freight line and assured the future success of the road.

ORGANIZATION

The offices of the Manistee and Grand Rapids are located at 433 River Street in this city and have all the necessary equipment for the transaction of a general railroad business. The officers of the company are: John Canfield president and general manager; Louis Sands, vice president; T. J. Ramsdell, secretary; E. G. Filer, treasurer; E. N. Sailing, auditor; H. W. Marsh, assistant auditor and traffic manager; J. W. Reading, superintended; E. M. Muelscher, chief engineer.

The stockholders of the corporation are as follows: John Canfield, E. G. Filer, James Dempsey, R. R. Blacker, Louis Sands, E. N. Salling, T. J. Ramsdell, A. E. Cartier, Charles Canfield, Frank Canfield, and H. W. Marsh.

CONNECTIONS

The Manistee and Grand Rapids operates seventy miles of road, extending from Manistee, the western terminus, to Tustin, Lake County, which is the eastern terminus of the line. The road connects with Chicago and West Michigan railroad at Canfield and with the Grand Rapids and Indiana at Luther, which enables it to shorten the time from this city to Grand Rapids, Chicago, and other points west and south by an hour, and will ultimately result in the establishment of passenger service out of this city.

EQUIPMENT

In the line of rolling stock the Manistee and Grand Rapids owns one hundred flat cars, four box cars, two combination passenger and baggage cars, and three locomotives. The road employs five station agents, and has buildings and station facilities at Manistee, Oak Hill, Filer City, Millerton, Canfield, and Luther. The Manistee terminal facilities are excellent, embracing yards and freight buildings in the heart of the city, connecting with a valuable water front on the Manistee River.

CONDITION OF THE ROAD

The Manistee and Grand Rapids has been very successful from the beginning and has no indebtedness. In 1896 Mr. H. W. Marsh, the present traffic manager, inaugurated a general freight service which has proven a very successful venture, the earnings of the line having steadily increased, making the introduction of a passenger service the next step in the evolution of the road. This will shortly be done and the result will be a material improvement in the railroad facilities possessed by Manistee. The Adams Express company operates over the line of the M. & G. R.

MR. H. W. MARSH

Henry W. Marsh, the assistant auditor and traffic manager of the Manistee and Grand Rapids railroad, was born in Racine, Wisconsin, February 9, 1847, where he lived for the first sixteen years of his life. He attended the public schools and also the high school of that city, coming to Manistee in 1864, where he has since resided

Mr. Marsh holds the office of vice president of the Canfield salt and Lumber Company, and also of the Union Lumber and Salt Company, and is the secretary of the Wolver- the Oil Company. In July, l896, he was elected a member of the board of education for a term of three years. He has proven himself an efficient railroad man, and since assuming the management of the M. & G. R. R. R. in 1896 has brought about a substantial improvement in the condition of the affairs and prospects of this company.

[The above article from Anniversary Number of the Manistee Daily News The Salt City of the Inland Seas]


Manistee & Grand Rapids Railroad

MICHIGAN EAST & WEST RAILROAD


Manistee & Grand Rapids Railroad, chartered Nov. 17, 1889, under the laws of Michigan, projected from Manistee to Grand Rapids, MI, distance 116 miles, with capital stock of $1,000,000.

The railroad appears to be built mainly to service the Union Lumber and Salt Company, and the Canfield Salt and Lumber Company. Both companies held large tracts of timber, which was reached by many short sidings or branch lines. Later the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway held large tracts of timber in the West Marion area, which was service by the Michigan East & West.

1896

grading line to Luther, to crossunder the Flint & Pere Marquette RR at Junction, near Stronach.

1897

to Canfield Jct., 44.71 miles, July 1, 1896, with Chicago & West Michigan RR.

1898

to Canfields 'Y', 2 engines, 4 box, 90 flat, 2 cabooses, 1 misc.

1899

3 stations; Manistee, Canfield, and Luther, passenger service commenced

1900

Manistee to Keenaw, 45 miles, Extension to Tustin approved, to cross under Grand Rapids & Indiana RR at Tustin, 3 stations, mixed train service.

1901

Passenger service listed to Rolfe from Manistee, 59.0 miles, two trains daily.

1905

3/17/05 extension 1.5 miles to Dighton, reached Marion in November. Depot located on site of Marion Produce Co. office, roundhouse - turntable, next to Ann Arbor tracks west side south of depot.

7/201907

excursion train picture at Marion shows - leaving Ann Arbor railroad station at Marion, train has two combination passenger cars, one combination car equipped with a cupola, motive power is a 4-4-0.

1909

branch, Dighton to Hartwick, 5 miles, several siding tracks in the Hartwick area.

1914

passenger trains from; Marion on Monday, Friday, and Wednesday; Manistee on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.

On January 20, 1914, the organization of the Michigan East & West Railway Company was perfected. This company was a reorganization which succeeded to the railroad property of the Manistee & Grand Rapids Railroad Company which was sold on foreclosure sale on November 24, 1913. The reorganization, capitalization and transfer of property in transaction have been approved by the Michigan Railroad Commission on December 24, 1913.

1915

Marion granted permission to Michigan, East & West to cross first street. The ME&W purchased the old creamery and remodeled it for use as a station. Officers; J. S. Joyce, President; C. H. Morev, Vice-President; Jacob Kleinhans, Secetary; F. P. Leffingwell, Treasurer. Adams Express Company as agent.

1916

A model "T" with railwheels, used with passenger service. Three passenger trains listed, two from Manistee to Marion, and one from Tustin to Marion.

1917

1917, passenger service at Marion discontinued, 40 per cent of the cost for coal had to come from Marion passenger revenue.

On December 24, 1917, the Michigan East & West Railway Company, which was a reorganizing made on January 14, 1914, succeeding the (Mich. RR Comm.

1918

1918, reports name as Michigan & Grand Rapids) Manistee & Grand Rapids Railroad Company, went into receivership. The reorganization of 1914 effected a large reduction in the liabilities and fixed charges of the company, but notwithstanding this reduction, the increasing adverse conditions under which the company operated had at the time receivership accumulated a deficit in operations amounting to $135,452.96. During 1918, Eugene Ford, receiver, carried on federal operations for some time. But finally, for lack of proper facilities for service, the operation on this line were taken over by the Federal Administration in connection with the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad and such was the status of the road at the close of the year.

1919

May 1919, Michigan East & West sold for junk basis at Manistee.

1920

1920, line out of service at Marion? Service in Luther until 1920?, Also known as M, GR & I?

PHYSICAL CONDITION OF STEAM RAILROADS
Manistee & Grand Rapids Railroad

This road was inspected October 19 [1909]. This line of road extends from Marion a connection with the Ann Arbor Railroad to Manistee. There is no regular passenger train service, the public being taken care of between these points by a mixed train service. One train each way daily, except Sundays. In addition to the main line from Marion to Manistee, the company has five branches, which are used exclusively for the removing of forest products. The main line from Marion to Dighton is 10 miles in length and has been built about five years. Very little surfacing has been done on this portion, and the surface and alignment of track is poor. The rails are considerably surface bent; the ties are in fair condition. There are no stations between these points. Considerable new fence has been built between Dighton and Marion and the same is of woven wire. From Dighton to Tustin the track is in fair condition. A number of ties have been renewed and the rail is 60 pound and in fair condition. The surface and alignment of track is fair. From Tustin to Manistee the general condition of the track is fair and the surface and alignment is much better than between Dighton and Tustin. 20,000 ties have been renewed on the line this year. The line is not generally fenced, but fencing has been built where requested and parties have their land enclosed by exterior fences. The station at Dighton is a small structure, having but one waiting room, and it would seem that the traffic presented would require larger station facilities. We are informed that it is the intention of the company to build a station at this point in the very near future. The station at Luther is a brick structure having one waiting room, and the station is well maintained and seems to be ample for the traffic presented. There are no other stations of any importance or where agents are maintained. The trains are operated under the standard telegraph code and orders are dispatched by telegraph. Very little attention is paid to the blocking of frogs and switches. The cuts are generally narrow and the track is poorly drained. A number of the highway crossings are without crossing signs. Switch targets are of various types, and switch stands are provided with switch locks. No switch lights - no night service. The equipment is as required by law. The cattle guards are generally of the "Pit type." All curves are generally well braced, or provided with tie plates. Section men are cleaning weeds off of the right of way. The ballast used on this line is of a very light quality.

[From the 1909 Annual Report of the Michigan Railroad Commission, State Library of Michigan.]


Equipment

YEAR

LOCOS

PASS

BOX

FLAT

COAL

M of W

1899

3

2

4

100



1907

3






1908







1909

5

3

4

82

46

2

Motive power

No.

type

bldr

CN#

blt

Acq.

Disp Notes

1

4-4-0

Baldwin





2

2-6-0

Baldwin

11875

1891


1907 to Manistee & North Eastern #19

3

2-6-0

Baldwin

16413

1899



8

2-6-0

Alco


1906



Station listing in 1919 public timetable

History items from Michigan Place Names, reprint 1986.

MP

Station

connecting line

----

-----------

-------------------------

0.0

Manistee

Pere Marquette RR, Manistee & North Eastern RR


Oakhill


5.2

Filer City

Delos L. Filer built the D. L. Filer & Sons mill here in 1867. Elihu G. Filer became the first postmaster on 3/10/1868; the village was platted the same year. Its post office closed 4/12/ 1871, but was restored from July 13, 1883, to date. Its station on the Manistee & North Eastern was called Filer's Switch.

8.

Marsh

(Marshville) Henry J. Marsh built a sawmill here on Stony Creek in Benona Township on 1862 and a grist mill in 1863; George M. Marsh became the first postmaster of the settlement on 4/13/1869, post office closed 1/15/1901, 1919

12.5

Hoags


14.

Tomlins


16.0

Elmton


22.3

Millerton

The site was secured by Dodge Squire who moved his shingle mill here on the Au Sable River, built a general store, and became the first postmaster on April 28, 1898, and the first railroad agent at the local station of the Manistee & Grand Rapids Railroad, also in 1898; it was named for John Miller who claimed to be the oldest resident in this part of the township.

25.

Sauble

post office 3/10/1910, 1919 Sheepdale

31.2

Peacock

Named for David J. Peacock, first postmaster on April 15, 1897, 11 miles north of Baldwin, (Peters- 1894 - 1901, post office 4/15/1897, actual on Pere Marquette RR, 11 miles north of Baldwin?), listed in 1916

31.

Canfield

Canfield Mill Settlement, on south bank of the Manistee River, near Lake Michigan. In 1849, John Canfield took over the mill and properties from his father, Roswell Canfield. Canfield & (E.D.) Wheeler Company built the village; when Poles began moving in about 1881, it became known as the Polish Settlement; the mill quit operating about 1900 and the settlement dwindled away, its last house being torn in 1923. Junction with Pere Marquette RR in 1901, called Peacock on the Pere Marquette RR.

34.

Pines

1919

38.

State's Switch

1919

39.4

Carey

(Careyville), Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway, 1893 - 1901

41.8

Luther

Post office 1/4/1882, village 1893, crossed Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway, 1901 1919

44.7

Keenan

1901

45.

Haaks

on a branch line

46.4

Hoist

1901, not listed 1905

47.0

Edgetts

lumber settlement, post office 7/22/1902

47.

Perrys


48.7

Riverbank

On the banks of the Pine River, developed around the general store and sawmill of Clarence A. Warren, post office 4/1/1904

49.9

Larsen

1901, not listed 1905

51.3

Spraque

1901, not listed 1905

52.

Hewitts

(Hewitts Lake) listed 1905

54.6

Tustin

Post office 4/10/1872, village 1893, junction with Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway. Leased station facilities at $90.17 per month.

57.7

Anderson

branch line connection

59.0

Rolfe

Line in to this point in 1901

59.

Rose Lake

branch line

60.9

Dighton

Station was dedicated to the public on Wednesday evening, July 21, 1915. Highest point in lower peninsula, post office 6/23/1884 - 6/30/1955, Jones and Green flooring mill

63.9

Dennis

Dennis Brother Mills ?

Crocker


66.1

Harwick

End of branch line, 5 miles, 1909; post office 12/13/1881 - 3/31/1911

71.9

Marion

Junction with Ann Arbor RR, used Ann Arbor Depot until it build own depot using a old creamery building, in 1915. line reached this point 11/1905

Michigan Manual listings

Station

1897

1899

1901

1903

1905

1907

1909

1911

1913

1916

Manistee

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Filer City

3

5

5

5

5

6

6

6

6

5.2

F. & P. M. Crossing

6

8

8

-

-

8

8

8

8


Boars Siding

10

12

13

13

13

12

12

12

12

12.5

Au Sable River

13

15

15

-

-

15

-

-

-


Howell's Siding

15

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

Canfield Camp

22

22

22

22

22

22

22

22

22

22.3

Lion's Crossing

25

25

-

-

-

25

-

-

-


C. & W. M. Crossing

30

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-


Canfield(s)


31

31

31

31

31

31

31

31

31.2

Careyville

38

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-


Carey


39

39

39

39

39

39

39

39


M. & L. RR Crossing

40

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-


G. R. & I. Crossing

40

41

41

-

-

-

-

-

-


Luther

42

42

42

42

42

42

42

42

42

41.8

Canfield's 'Y'

45

45

-

-

-

-

-

-

-


Keenan

-

-

45

45

45

44

44

44

44


Perry's

-

-

-

-

-

47

-

-

-


Edgetts

-

-

-

47

47

48

47

47

47

47.0

Riverbank

-

-

-

49

49

49

49

49

49


Larsen

-

-

-

50

-

-

-

-

-


Hewitts

-

-

-

52

52

-

-

-

-


Tustin

-

-

-

55

55

55

55

55

55

54.6

Anderson

-

-

-

-

-

58

58

58

58

57.7

Rofle

-

-

-

59

-

-

-

-

-


Dighton

-

-

-

-

61

61

61

61

61

60.9

Rose Lake

-

-

-

64

-

-

-

-

-


Harwick

-

-

-

-

-

68

69

69

69


Crocker

-

-

-

-

-

68

68

68

68

67.9

Marion

-

-

-

-

-

72

72

72

72

71.9

Harwick on branchline

ORGINAL NAME

OTHER NAMES & DATES;


F. & P. M. Crossing

F&PM Junction 1899

Marsh 1907

Au Sable River

Sauble 1899

Tomlins 1907

Howell's Siding

Elmton 1901


Canfield Camp

Millerton 1899


Lion's Crossing

Goodrich 1899

Sheepdale 1907

Canfield(s)

Peacock 1907

Careyville

Carey

State's switch 1907



Mile


Years Listed in Public Time Tables

Post

Station

1901

1905

190?

1909

1916

1919

1920

0.0

Manistee

X

X

X

X

X

X


4.0

Oakhill








5.2

Filer City

X

X

X


X



8.0

Marsh



X


X



12.5

Hoags

X

X

X





14.0

Tomlins



X





16.0

Elmton

X

X

X


X



22.3

Millerton

X

X

X


X



25.0

Sauble





X



25.0

Sheepdale



X





31.2

Peacock



X


X

X


31.0

Canfield

X

X






34.0

Pines






X


38.0

State's Switch



X



X


39.4

Carey

X

X






41.8

Luther

X

X

X

X

X

X


44.7

Keenan

X

X

X





45.0

Haaks

B







46.4

Hoist

X







47.0

Edgetts

X

X

X

X

X



47.0

Perrys



X





48.7

Riverbank

X

X

X


X



49.9

Larsen

X







51.3

Spraque

X







52.0

Hewitts


X






54.6

Tustin

X

X

X

X

X

X


57.7

Anderson

B


B

B

B



59.0

Rolfe

X







59.

Rose Lake

B







60.9

Dighton


X

X

X

X

X


63.9

Dennis








66.9

Crocker



X





68.0

Harwick



B

B




67.9

Crocker



X





71.9

Marion



X

X

X

X



There is confusion to what railroad trackage existed at Marion; a wye was required to turn the locomotives which was located south of Marion. Water and Fuel was required, possibly used Ann Arbor railroad, which had both. Passenger trains laid over at Marion, probably on creamery track or main line, insufficient trackage on the M E&W to do any storage of cars. It is agreed that where the lumber yard stood there were railroad shops, with a turntable, build when the Toledo, Ann Arbor & Cadillac build thru the town. Have not been able to prove this via maps or company records.


Web page by Henry F. Burger Jan.16. 2014



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