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Anthracite Heritage Museum & Scranton Iron Furances 6/25/2010 Part 2



by Chris Guenzler



From the Anthracite Heritage Museum I drove back to Scranton to the Scranton Iron Furnaces.

Brief History

The Scranton Iron represent the early iron industry in the United States. The four massive stone blast furnaces are the remnants of a once extensive plant operated by the Lackawanna Iron & Steel Company. Started in 1840 as Scranton, Grant & Company, the firm had the largest iron production capacity in the United States by 1865. By 1880 it poured 125,000 tons of pig iron, which was converted in its rolling mill and foundry into T-rails and other end products. In 1902, the company dismantled the plant and moved it to Lackawanna, New York to be closer to the high-grade iron ores coming out of the Mesabi Range.





The sign at the entrance to the Scranton Iron Furnaces.





Display Boards.





This one is about the Scranton Iron Furnaces.





This one is about the people behind the Scranton Iron Furnaces.





This one is about making steel.





Looking down into one Iron Furnace.





This one tells the history of the Lackawanna Valley.





This one tells about the settlement of the Lackawanna Valley.





A display of rails made in Scranton below the Iron Furnaces with the Roaring Brook in this scene.





This one tells about the City of Scranton.





More tops of the Iron Furnaces.





The former Lackawanna Railroad now the Radisson where I spent four nights.





The Electric City Scranton Iron Furnaces Station.





Upper view of the Scranton Iron Furnaces.





Lower view of the Scranton Iron Furnaces.





More display boards.





All of the lower openings of the Scranton Iron Furnaces.





A view looking up a Scranton Iron Furnace.





Two views of the Scranton Iron Furnaces.





That rail display.





Our last views of the Scranton Iron Furnaces. Next stop the Electric City Trolley.



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