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McCloud River Railroad Company, McCloud River Lumber Company, McCloud Railway Company- Locomotive Rosters

McCloud Rails

All Time Locomotive Roster
Four McCloud Baldwin diesels in front of the McCloud shop in 1957. Photo by and courtesy of Jerry Lamper.

Click on locomotive numbers for photos.


McCloud River Railroad Company/McCloud Railway Company


Steam Locomotives


#1 , Baldwin 2-6-0,1891, c/n 11627, drivers 50", cylinders 16x24, weight 78,000 lbs, boiler pressure 140 lbs., tractive force 14,600 lbs. From California Railroad #2 1897; Re-numbered #12.

#2 , Stearns 3-Truck Heisler, unknown c/n, drivers 40", cylinders 18x15, weight 120,000 lbs., boiler pressure 170 lbs., tractive force 24,000 lbs. Apparently purchased new in 1897, reported to be the heaviest Heisler built to that date. Disposition uncertain, but was off the property by about 1905.

#3 , Stearns 2-Truck Heisler c/n 1004, drivers 40", cylinders 16x14, weight 90,000 lbs., boiler pressure 160 lbs., tractive effort 17,500 lbs. Built June 1896 for the Blakely Railroad, named "Maggie"; returned to manufacturer due to poor performance. Stearns sent the locomotive to the McCloud River to help that railroad out while the builder tried to sort out many issues with the #2, with the McCloud purchasing the locomotive; to Weed Lumber Company, later to Nevada County Narrow Guage RR, then to Willamette Valley Lumber Company; scrapped 1930.

#4 , Baldwin 2-6-2,1898, c/n 16239, drivers 44", cylinders 16x24, weight 96,000 lbs., boiler pressure 160 lbs., tractive effort 19,000 lbs. Purchased new 1898. Scrapped 1939.

#5/#6 ,Baldwin 0-6-6-0T, 1900, c/n 17684-17685, drivers 40", cylinders 11.5x19x20*, weight 161,400 lbs as a single locomotive, 75,000 lbs. each after split into two, boiler pressure 200 lbs., tractive effort 35,500 lbs. as a single locomotive, 17,750 lbs. each after split into two. Locomotive was purchased new 1900 and basically consisted of two 0-6-0 tank locomotive permanently coupled back to back. Machine was built to handle the 4% grades on the line, but derailed constantly on the light trackage. McCloud quickly separated the locomotive into the two 0-6-0T locomotives, re-numbering one of them #5 in the process. The #5 was sold to Weed Lumber Company circa 1919, then to Lystul-Lawson Logging Company #5 and was scrapped; #6 was sold to Atkinson Construction Co. #6, then to A.D. Schader #6, then to Permanente Metals Co. #2515. Scrapped 1949.

#7 , Baldwin 4-6-0, 1886, c/n 7935, drivers 57", cylinders 17.5x24, weight 92,000 lbs., boiler pressure 150 lbs., tractive effort 17,400 lbs. Built as St. Louis & San Francisco #300-series (maybe #302); to Atlantic & Pacific #52 circa 1890; probably disposed of prior to consolidation of A&P into Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe in 1897; to McCloud River in late 1900 or early 1901. Retired 1/1917 and sold to F. Rolandi, Hetch Hetchy Dam Contractor. Final disposition unrecorded.

#8 , Baldwin 2-6-2, 1901, c/n 18595, drivers 44", cylinders 16x24, weight 107,000 lbs, boiler pressure 160 lbs., tractive effort 19,000 lbs. Purchased new. Sold to Amador Central Railroad #7 1939; placed on display in Ione, CA where it still is today.

#9 , Baldwin 2-6-2, 1901, c/n 18596, drivers 44", cylinders 16x24, weight 107,000 lbs., boiler pressure 160 lbs., tractive effort 19,000 lbs. Purchased new. Sold to Yreka Western Railroad #9 1939; to Amador Central #9 1944; to Nezperce & Idaho Railroad #9; stored derelict on Nezperce & Idaho until rescued in early 1960s by a private individual. Moved to Mid-Continental Railroad Museum, North Freedom, Wisconsin, where it was restored to operation. In 1972 the owner started up the Kettle Moraine Scenic Railroad, where the #9 operated until 2001 when the KMRR closed. Locomotive sold and moved to Age of Steam Roundhouse, Sugarcreek, Ohio, in 2015.

#10 , Baldwin 2-6-2, built 1901, c/n 18674, drivers 44", cylinders 16x24, weight 107,000 lbs., boiler pressure 180 lbs., tractive effort 21,330 lbs. Purchased new. To Yreka Western #10 1925; scrapped at Yreka 1944.

#11 , Baldwin 2-6-2, built 1904, c/n 23875, drivers 44", cylinders 13x22x24*, weight 147,000 lbs., boiler pressure 200 lbs., tractive effort 21,240 lbs. Purchased new. Sold to W.S. Zimmerman (scrapper) 1926. Sat in Zimmerman scrap yard until cut up 1939.

#12 , Formerly #1. Used primarily on the McCloud-Mt. Shasta passenger train; scrapped 1932.

#13 was never applied to any McCloud locomotive

#14 , Baldwin 2-8-2, built 1907, c/n 30850, drivers 48", cylinders 20x28, weight 179,000 lbs., boiler pressure 180 lbs., tractive effort 35,700 lbs. Purchased new. Scrapped by end of 1953.

#15 , Baldwin 2-8-2, built 1907, c/n 30851, drivers 48", cylinders 20x28, weight 179,000 lbs., boiler pressure 180 lbs., tractive effort 35,700 lbs. Purchased new. Scrapped by end of 1953.

1st #16 , Lima 3-Truck Shay, built 1911. c/n 2401, drivers 36", cylinders 14.5x15, weight 180,000 lbs., boiler pressure 200 lbs., tractive effort 40,450 lbs. Purchased new. Sold to Fruit Growers Supply Co. #4 at Susanville, CA 1924; scrapped at close of that operation.

2nd #16 **, Baldwin 2-8-2, built 1913, c/n 39394, drivers 48", cylinders 20.5x28, weight 176,000 lbs., boiler pressure 170 lbs, tractive effort 35,500 lbs. Purchased from Silver Falls Timber Company #101 1939; sold for scrap on 23 November 1955.

1st #17 , Lima 3-truck Shay, built 1911, c/n 2402, drivers 36", cylinders 14.5x15, weight 180,000 lbs., boiler pressure 200 lbs., tractive effort 40,450 lbs. Purchased new; to Fruit Growers Supply Co. #5 at Susanville, CA 1924. Scrapped at close of that operation.

2nd #17 **, Baldwin 2-8-2, built 1916, c/n 42912, drivers 48", cylinders 20.5x28, weight 179,000 lbs., boiler pressure 180 lbs., tractive effort 35,700 lbs. From Pacific Portland Cement Co. #102 1942; scrapped by end of 1953.

#18 **, Baldwin 2-8-2, built 1914, c/n 41709, drivers 48", cylinders 20x28, weight 178,400 lbs., boiler pressure 180 lbs., tractive effort 35,700 lbs. Purchased new, diplayed at Panama Pacific Exposition in San Francisco prior to entering service on the McCloud. Sold to Yreka Western #18 1956; operated there until blowing a cylinder head while powering a special excursion 1964; stored at Yreka 1964-1998, when it was re-sold to the new McCloud Railway. Restored to operation by McCloud Railway, re-entered service Feb. of 2001. Sold January 2005 to Virginia & Truckee Restoration Committee; stored in McCloud until April 2007, when it was trucked to Oakdale, CA, for use on the Sierra Railroad. Moved to Virginia & Truckee Railroad, Virginia City, NV, in mid-summer 2010. To become V&T #31.

#19 **, Baldwin 2-8-2, built 1915, c/n #42000, drivers 48", cylinders 20x28, weight 178,400 lbs., boiler pressure 180 lbs., tractive effort 35,700 lbs. Built as Caddow & Choctaw RR #4; to Choctaw River Lumber Company; to United Mining & Smelting Co. #2069 (in Mexico); to McCloud River #19 1924; to Yreka Western #19 1953; to Oregon, Pacific & Eastern #19 1970; back to Yreka Western 1988. Last operated on the YW in 2008. Sold 10/6/2016 at auction to Age of Steam Roundhouse, Sugar Creek, Ohio.

#20 , Baldwin 2-6-2, built 1924, c/n 57617, drivers 46", cylinders 17x24, weight 132,000 lbs., boiler pressure 185 lbs., tractive effort 23,700 lbs. Purchased new. Sold for scrap on 23 November 1955.

#21 , Baldwin 2-6-2, built 1924, c/n 57618, drivers 46", cylinders 17x24, weight 132,000 lbs., boiler pressure 185 lbs., tractive effort 23,700 lbs. Purchased new. Sold for scrap on 23 November 1955.

#22 , Alco 2-6-2, built 1925, c/n 66316, drivers 46", cylinders 17x24, weight 130,000 lbs., boiler pressure 185 lbs., tractive effort 23,700 lbs. Purchased new. Sold for scrap on 16 November 1955.

#23 , Alco 2-6-2, built 1925, c/n 66317, drivers 46", cylinders 17x24, weight 130,000 lbs., boiler pressure 185 lbs., tractive effort 23,700 lbs. Purchased new. Sold to Arcata & Mad River Railroad #11 1953; scrapped in Eureka, CA 1956.

#24 , Alco 2-6-2, built 1925, c/n 66434, drivers 46", cylinders 19x24, weight 144,000 lbs., boiler pressure 185 lbs., tractive effort 28,800 lbs.. Purchased new. Sold for scrap on 16 November 1955.

#25 , Alco 2-6-2, built 1925, c/n 66435, drivers 46", cylinders 19x24, weight 144,000 lbs., boiler pressure 185 lbs., tractive effort 28,800 lbs. Purchased new. Retired and stored 1956; restored to service 1962 for excursion work, operated until 1975; restored again to service 1982, operated until 1986. Title to locomotive passed to Great Western Railroad Museum, but the machine remained stored on McCloud property. McCloud Railway got title back in late 1995. Restored to service by Labor Day Weekend of 1997; operated Aug. 1997-Feb. 2001. Locomotive stored 2001-2007, when a movie company returned the locomotive to operation. #25 operated sporadically between 2007 and 2008. Sold 2/8/2011 to Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad, Garibaldi, OR.

#26 , Alco 2-8-2, built 1915, c/n 55492, drivers 48", cylinders 20x28, weight 195,000 lbs., boiler pressure 180 lbs., tractive effort 35,700 lbs. Built as Copper River & Northwestern Ry (Alaska) #72; sold to McCloud River 1938; sold for scrap November 1955. Originally equipped with a large tender; after several years of operation in McCloud the original tender was transfered to the Shevlin-Hixon Lumber Company in Bend, OR and replaced with a smaller Vanderbuilt-style tender.

#27 , Alco 2-8-2, built 1915, c/n 57291, drivers 48", cylinders 20x28, weight 195,000 lbs., boiler pressure 180 lbs., tractive effort 35,700 lbs. Built as Copper River & Northwestern Ry. #73; sold to McCloud River 1938; scrapped by end of 1953. Originally equipped with a large tender; after several years of operation in McCloud the original tender was transfered to the Shevlin-Hixon Lumber Company in Bend, OR and replaced with a smaller Vanderbuilt-style tender.

* Locomotives 5, 6 and 11 were Vauclain (the name of the inventor) compound locomotives, meaning that they had two sets of cylinders on each locomotive instead of the one set normally found on steam locomotives. In a "normal" or simple locomotive, the steam is passed through the cylinder once, then released to the atmoshphere. In a compound locomotive, the steam first passes through a high pressure cylinder, then passes through a larger low pressure cylinder to be used again, then was released. The compounds were good pullers- it is written that the McCloud's #11 could pull 6 loads of lumber "over the hill" to Mt. Shasta City on wet or dry rail, while the other 2-6-2's on the line at the time could do around 4 cars on dry rail and 2 cars on wet rail. However, any efficiency of steam use gained was more than offset by increased maintenance costs, and most compounds were later re-built into simple locomotives. McCloud #'s 6 and 11 were exceptions, as both were never converted to simple locomotives.

**Locomotives 2nd 16, 2nd 17, 18 and 19 were all involved in a tender swap. When the 2nd #16 arrived in McCloud it was in need of an overhaul, which it received. When the work on the locomotive was completed and it was ready for service, its tender had not yet entered the shops. The #18 was in the shops for some repair, and its tender was in good shape, so the #16 was mated with the #18's tender to get the locomotive on the road. By the time that the #18 was leaving the shop the #17 was entering, and it had a good tender, so the #17s tender was simply taken off of the #17 and mated to the #18. When the #17 was released from the shop the tender that came with the #16 was then mated to it. One final swap came in 1953, just before the #19 left the property for the Yreka Western. The tender behind the #19 was in poor shape, and it was swapped with the tender from the #16, which had been the original tender from the #18. Thus the original tender from the #16 went to scrap with locomotive #17, the original tender from the #19 went to scrap with the #16, the #18 today has the tender that was originally assigned to the #17, and the #19 in Yreka has the #18's original tender. Common McCloud practice was to weld the number of the locomotive each tender was assigned to onto the frame of each tender, and before the #17s tender was mated to the #18 the shop crew made the 7 on the frame an 8.

After the arrival of the diesels, the McCloud steam locomotives were placed into a scrap line while they waited to be sold. Click here to see pictures of that line.


Diesel Locomotives


#28 , Baldwin DRS-6-6-1500, built 1948, c/n 73653, 1500 horsepower. Purchased new. Damaged in mid-1960’s; stored behind McCloud shops after that, heavily cannibalized to keep other Baldwins operational. Scrapped at McCloud 1970.

#29 , Baldwin DRS-6-6-1500, built 1950, c/n 74812, 1500 horsepower. Purchased new; sold to Magma Arizona Railroad #10 1969; to Arizona Railway Museum mid-1990's, where it is displayed.

#30 , Baldwin S-12, built 1953, c/n 75912, 1200 horsepower. Purchased new, demonstrated on the Oregon & Northwestern prior to delivery to McCloud; sold to Rayonier, Inc. #203 (Clallam operation) 1963; to U.S. Steel (Pittsburg, CA) #16; to Feather River Rail Society (Portola, CA); to McCloud Railway Company 1995. Currently stored out of service on McCloud Railway.

#31 , Baldwin S-8, built 1953, c/n 75913, 800 horsepower. Technically an S-12, but built with a steel box in place of a turbocharger. Purchased new. Sold to Chrome Crankshaft Co. 1969; to Magma Arizona Railroad #9 1969; at last report still stored out of service on Magma Arizona.

#32 , Baldwin RS-12, built 1955, c/n 76024, 1200 horsepower. Purchased new. Sold to Chrome Crankshaft Co. 1969, stored at Western Pacific's Stockton shop complex; to California Western Railroad #55 1970; Scrapped in Fort Bragg, CA circa 1995, with many parts going to Traveltown along with the #33.

#33 , Baldwin RS-12, built 1955, c/n 76105, 1200 horsepower. Purchased new; sold to Chrome Crankshaft Co. 1969, stored at Western Pacific's Stockton Shop Complex; to California Western Railroad #56 1970; donated to Traveltown Museum in Los Angeles about 1992, currently on display there.

#34 , Baldwin AS-616, built 1952, c/n 75449, 1600 horsepower. Built as Southern Pacific #5253; to McCloud River 1963; to Oregon & Northwestern #4 1969; stored at Burns, OR following abandonment of that road in 1984; acquired from Snow Mountain Pine (successor interest to O&NW) by Feather River Rail Society about 1991; currently on display and available for sale at Western Pacific Railroad Museum in Portola, CA. One deal to sell it to Arkansas Railroad Museum fell through, though another possible sale is pending.

#35 , Baldwin DRS-6-6-1500 diesel, built 1949, c/n 74261, 1500 horsepower. Built as Southern Pacific #5207; to Chrome Crankshaft 1963; to McCloud River 1964; to U.S. Steel (Geneva, UT) 1969. Assumed scrapped in early 1980s.

1st #36 , Baldwin DRS-6-6-1500 , built 1949, c/n 74258, 1500 horsepower. Built as Southern Pacific #5204; to Chrome Crankshaft 1963; to McCloud River 1964. The #36 was put into its numberboards, but the unit was never painted out of SP colors. The unit did see some limited yard service in McCloud, but spent most of it's time under McCloud ownership sitting behind the McCloud shops providing parts to keep the other Baldwins operating. Unit was scrapped by 1970.

2nd #36 , General Motors Electro-Motive Division SD-38, built 1969, c/n 34880, 2000 horsepower. Purchased new. Retained by ITEL corp. in 1992 following sale of McCloud River to McCloud Railway; stored in McCloud; sold to McCloud Railway late 1993. Locomotive sidelined by electrical problems in 2005, and it has been heavily cannibalized for parts since. As of 10/2016, the locomotive is scheduled to be possibly rebuilt in McCloud and then moved to Dakota Southern Railroad, Chamberland, South Dakota.

#37 ,General Motors Electro-Motive Division SD-38, built 1969, c/n 34881, 2000 horsepower. Purchased new. Retained by ITEL corp. in 1992 following sale of McCloud River to McCloud Railway; stored in McCloud. Sold to McCloud Railway late 1993. Transferred 10/2016 from McCloud to Dakota Southern Railroad, Chamberland, South Dakota.

#38 , General Motors Electro-Motive Division SD-38, built 1969, c/n 34882, 2000 horsepower. Purchased new. Included in sale of property to McCloud Railway 1992. Locomotive suffered cracked engine block or similar damage in January 2010. As of 10/2016, the locomotive is scheduled to be possibly rebuilt in McCloud and then moved to Dakota Southern Railroad, Chamberland, South Dakota.

#39 , General Motors Electo-Motive Division SD38-2, built 1974, c/n 74623-1, 2000 horsepower. Purchased new. Included in sale of property to McCloud Railway 1992; sold to Union Pacific #2824 1997, later renumbered to UPY #824; in service on UP (yard service in the Los Angeles area).

#101 ,Plymouth DLC-2 gas-mechanical switcher,c/n 2101, built 8/1925, 63 horsepower. Built for McCloud River Lumber Company; to McCloud River Railroad; used the unit in mostly maintenance-of-way work for many years before deeded to Great Western Railroad Museum Stored for many years in the old Champion International truck shop building on east edge of McCloud until moved to Merrill, OR, where it is stored.

In addition to the above, the McCloud River purchased two ex-Alaska Railroad GP-7's (Alaskan #1804 and #1810) in 1988 primarily to test the re-building capability of the McCloud shops. The Electro-Motive Division of General Motors originally built the pair for the U.S. Army, and they were among the very few GP's that rode on standard switcher trucks (like those under #30 and #31) instead of road switcher trucks. The Alaska Railroad later replaced the switcher trucks with Alco-built road trucks taken off retired Alco RS-type locomotives. The #1804 was actually made operable by the McCloud River about 1989 and was used in limited service on the railroad. The #1810 was included in the sale to the McCloud Railway in 1992 and promptly sold, eventually ending up the property of Nevada Industrial Switch. About early 1993 the McCloud Railway purchased #1804 and used it occassionally before selling it to Nevada Industrial Switch as well about late 1993. The two locomotives were brought back to operation by the NIS, and they were used to film the movie Under Siege II in Colorado. The #1810 operated on the Oregon Pacific Railroad in the Willamette Valley until mid-2008, when the company sold it to Archers-Daniels-Midland; the #1804 operated on the Pacific Harbor Lines in Los Angeles for a while before going to the Gold Coast Railroad Museum in Miami, Florida, where it is operations as Atlantic Coast Line #1804.

In 1978 the McCloud shops performed maintenance work including installation of new main generators and other prime mover work on a number of Southern Pacific locomotives on a contract basis. SP #3859, a GP-9 type locomotive, was one of the first to be run through the shops. Following the work the unit was used on a few freight trains on the McCloud to test the unit before returning it to the SP.

The SD38s- When they were new


McCloud River Lumber Company


Standard Gauge

#1 , General Electric 70-tonner, built 1955, c/n 32302, 600 horsepower. Purchased new; sold to Port of Tacoma (Tacoma, WA) #702 1961; to Oregon, Pacific & Eastern Railroad (Cottage Grove, OR) #12 1973; to Modesto & Empire Traction Company (Stockton, CA) #608 1983; Retired 2009 and sold to Sterling Rail (dealer); sold to Last Mountain Railway (Mobile Grain, Ltd.), Saskatchewan, Canada; Trucked to new owner in August 2011.

#101 ,Plymouth DLC-2 gas-mechanical switcher,c/n 2101, built 8/1925, 63 horsepower. Purchased new. To McCloud River Railroad; to Great Western Railroad Museum. Currently stored in Merrill, OR.

#103 ,Plymouth DLC-2 gas-mechanical switcher, c/n 2766, built 12/1927, 63 horsepower. Purchased new.

One of the two lumber company Plymouths went to the railroad company. For more information see the entry under the information for #39 in the Railroad section above.

From 1897 to 1955 the lumber company largely owned and operated its own logging spurs, with log trains interchanged to the railroad company for delivery to the McCloud mill. With the exception of a handful of small Plymouth-type gas mechanical switchers, the lumber company relied entirely on steam locomotives leased from the railroad. In the early years the power was essentially pooled; in later years the railroad generally operated with the fleet of mikados it had amassed. The six prairie types purchased from Alco and Baldwin in 1924-1925 were the first locomotives (outside of the two Shays) that were purchased specifically for lumber company use (although they did see their fair share of mainline service through the years). The lumber company dieselized its logging operation with the #1 in 1955. Both of the railroad’s Baldwin switchers, #30 and #31, were used extensively on the lumber company log lines in the Burney basin.


Narrow Gauge

Up until 1969 the McCloud River Lumber Company operated an extensive narrow (28-inch) gauge railroad system that was used to move lumber around within the massive McCloud mill complex. The company used the following locomotives on that narrow guage system:

McCloud River Lbr. Co., McCloud, CA:

#2241 Plymouth C/N 2241 03-26 5 tons 32½ HP GM

Champion International-US Plywood Div. McCloud, CA:

#4204 Vulcan C/N 4204 04-37 7 tons 67 HP DM

#4251 Vulcan C/N 4251 12-38 5 tons 44 HP DM

#? Milwaukee 1912? 7 tons GM; presumed scrapped before 1940

#? Baldwin C/N 58425 05-25 18 HP BE

#? GE 1922? BE; scrapped 1946

#? GE 1922? BE; converted to DM 1946 with Buda-Lanova engine

One of the Vulcans was used in the 1970s on a short-lived tourist railroad near Florence on the Oregon coast with a fake steam loco shroud. It reportedly went to the Oregon Electric Ry. Museum at Glenwood, OR, after that.

McCloud converted a Cat 60 to a self-propelled rotary snowplow in 1937. It replaced a smaller gas powered plow.

All of above equipment in use when the line closed in 1969 except where noted.

Narrow Gauge roster information provided by John A Taubeneck.

Untitled5.jpg
This is a Caterpillar add from a timber industry trade publication that features one of the lumber company’s narrow gauge locomotives and is from the Glen Comstock collection. To view this ad full size, click here.

General Notes

The tender of the #21 still exists. While the unit was on the way to the scrapper, it passed through Stockton, CA where Stockton Terminal & Eastern #3 (another 2-6-2) was undergoing attempted restoration. The tender of the #3 was in poor shape, but the tender of the #21 was in good shape and a tender swap was effected. The #3 (still with #21's tender) is now in the restoration shop of the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramento. The McCRRR lettering and number are still plainly visible.

The McCloud was always an innovator when it came to motive power. The #5/#6 combination was an experimental machine, designed by Baldwin to try to keep up with articulated and mallet-type locomotives that were starting to appear from other builders, but the #6 as a joint unit ended up a disaster on the McCloud, spending more time on the ground than in service. The machine was not very old when it was split into two units.

The #14 and #15 were the first logging-style Mikados built for any railroad. They were incredibly successful, and Baldwin later went on to build hundreds more like them for short line and logging railroad service.

Diesels were still fairly uncommon in 1948, especially on shortlines. The McCloud’s purchase of the #28 was fairly unusual at the time, especially considering that most shortline diesel purchases up to that point were for small switcher-type units.

Typical motive power assignments into the early 1960’s saw three units assigned to the daily Burney run (usually the #’s 31, 32 and 33), while either the #28 or #29 worked the McCloud yard. The night run to Mt. Shasta City would generally be handled by the #28/#29 and one of the switchers, while the #32 and #33 would make the run to Lookout. The #'s 30 and 31 alternated on the Burney switcher, which switched the sawmills and log lines around the Burney basin. The railroad decided in late 1963/early 1964 to replace the #30 with some more road power that would give the line a little more flexibility with its motive power fleet. The end result was the purchase of the #34, #35 and first #36 from the Southern Pacific. The #34 went into service, but before the other two could be made operational the movement of logs by rail ended. The #35 was painted but never lettered, and it sat in the McCloud yard until it was forced into service by the loss of the #28. The 1st #36 was used in limited yard service before being relegated to a parts supply along with the #28. Baldwin ceased construction of locomotives in 1956, and as a result the #28 and the 1st #36 were parted out to keep the rest of the Baldwins operable.

As noted, Baldwin ceased building locomotives in 1956, and by the mid-1960’s the McCloud’s Baldwin fleet was getting worn and spare parts were becoming hard to find.  The railroad started searching for replacement power, cumulating with the purchase of the three SD38s in 1969.  However, in 1967 the Alco C-415 demonstrator spent a week on the McCloud.  Alco produced a report about the demonstration, including a proposal that the McCloud River purchase three of the units to replace the existing Baldwins .  The McCloud did not take Alco up on that offer.  Information about the C-415 demonstration can be found here.

The operating pattern after the arrival of the SD38’s in 1969 saw two units assigned to the daylight Burney run while the third worked the McCloud mill and yard. Night operations generally saw two units working to Mt. Shasta City while the third went to Lookout. The operating demands left no room for shopping and maintenance of the locomotives nor any flexibility should a heavy train require three units on one of the runs, and the result was the addition of the #39 in 1974.

When traffic started to slide in 1978 the railroad leased the #38 and #39 out to the Southern Pacific. They stayed on the SP primarily working in the Willamette Valley until early 1982 when the two were returned home. By May of 1982 the #38 was wearing the new brown paint scheme that was applied to the #36 and #37 shortly afterwards. The #39 remained in the factory-applied orange and white. The late 1970’s also saw the McCloud re-build several locomotives for the Southern Pacific, and these were used on McCloud freights from time to time.

The railroad continued to lease out power to other railroads as needed. The #36 and #37 were usually the ones to go out on lease, as they spent a good deal of the mid- to late 1980’s and early 1990’s working for either the Union Pacific or Burlington Northern railroads before coming home by late 1991.