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X Class
CLASS  X    4-8-2


Introduced:    1908 Number in Class:    18


X Class Register





Locomotive Specifications

Builder:
   NZR Addington
   Converted NZR Hutt and NZR Hillside (1)

Engine Weight:    
66.7 tons
Tender Weight:    27.3 tons Total Weight:    94.0 tons Adhesive Weight:    
46.7 tons
Length over Buffers:    
56' 9 3/4"
Total Wheelbase:    
48' 6 3/8"
Engine Wheelbase:    28' 7" Coupled Wheelbase:    
13' 6"
Tender Wheelbase:    
12' 9 3/4"
Driver Wheel Dia.:    45" Cylinders HP:    
Two - 13" x 22"
Cylinders LP:    
Two - 22" x 22"
Grate Area:    37.1 sq ft Evaporative Area:    
2066 sq ft
Superheated Area:     Working Pressure:    
230 psig
Tractive Effort:    
26620 lbs f
Coal Capacity:    4.0 tons Oil Capacity:     Water Capacity:    
2200 gals

Locomotive Specifications after Rebuild (1943-1949)

Engine Weight:    66.6 tons Tender Weight:    
28.55 tons
Total Weight:    95.15 tons Adhesive Weight:    
45.6 tons
Length over Buffers:    
56' 9 3/4"
Total Wheelbase:    
48' 6 3/8"
Engine Wheelbase:    
28' 7"
Coupled Wheelbase:    
13' 6"
Tender Wheelbase:    12' 9 3/4" Driver Wheel Dia.:    45" Cylinders HP:    
Four - 13" x 22"
Cylinders LP:    
Grate Area:    37.5 sq ft Evaporative Area:    
1185 sq ft
Superheated Area:    
168 sq ft
Working Pressure:    
215 psig
Tractive Effort:    
29500 lbs f
Coal Capacity:    5.0 tons Oil Capacity:     Water Capacity:    
2200 gals

Remarks:     One of New Zealand's largest and most powerful locomotives, the 'X' class was designed for use on the heavy North Island Main Trunk gradients. It was probably also the first 4-8-2 or "Mountain" type in the world. Conceived as a four cylinder de Glehn compound, eleven were rebuilt as four-cylinder simple engines in 1945-1951. The boiler pressure of 250 lb sq in. was the highest ever carried in New Zealand by a locomotive with an orthodox boiler. Starting tractive effort of 31,150 lb f.

Preserved Locomotive
  Fielding & Districts Steam Rail Society,    Fielding -     X 444,     NZR Addington #97/1902   Restoring



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