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Missouri Pacific Hi-Railers, Off-rail Vehicles & Alternate Transportation

MP MOW Crew and crane Trucks at Poplar Bluff, Missouri - Elvin Klepzig photo

Many of the vehicles pictured below were gathered from other images at Screaming Eagles. Some are unique to this page. Most are poor quality images, as trucks and cars were often seen lurking in the long shadows of the more glamorous rail power. Still we hope this page can provide some insight into another overlooked area of railroading.



Click on the thumbnails to see a larger image



Unit:

Missouri Pacific
company car
Location/Date of Photo:

Freeport, TX
1976-1977
Road No.

unknown
Photographer:

Nathan Griffin Photo
Was there a car more classic for the 1970's than the Chevy? Blow-up from MP1190 photograph, taken at Freeport, Texas, behind the depot 1977.

Unit:

Missouri Pacific
company car
Location/Date of Photo:

unknown
1960-1970's
Road No.

unknown
Photographer:

Brian Paul Ehni Photo
This time its another symbol of the 1960-70's, a station wagon, as seen in a close-up from Brian Paul Ehni's shot of business car MP8 -

Unit:

Missouri Pacific
Hi-rail truck
Location/Date of Photo:

unknown
1960-1970's
Road No.

unknown
Photographer:

© George Elwood photo
"Buzzsawed" truck in typical colors seen lurking in the background. From close-up of A&S #1517.

Unit:

Missouri Pacific
Hi-rail truck
Location/Date of Photo:

Paris, TX
December 1982
Road No.

unknown
Photographer:

© Gary Morris Photo
Looks like a Ford similar to one above, this time looking at the tailgate. From this we can make out a rotating beacon light on the cab roof, spare tire in the bed and the hi-railer add-on beneath the bumper. From close-up of Paris, Texas depot.

Unit:

Missouri Pacific
MoW truck
Location/Date of Photo:

unknown
unknown
Road No.

unknown
Photographer:

Jerry Carson Photo/T. Greuter Collection
Blown-up from a slide, the MoW truck wears the MP buzzsaw on the door, has a locker/equipment box behind the cab and an open flatbed with tall slatted sides of wood construction.


Unit:

Missouri Pacific
MoW truck
Location/Date of Photo:

Laredo, TX
January 1978
Road No.

unknown
Photographer:

© Gary Morris Photo
MP truck, this time with short sides around the flatbed. In the full shot there's also a company pickup. Seen at Missouri Pacific station, Jan 78 at Laredo, Texas.

Unit:

Missouri Pacific
MoW truck
crane truck
Location/Date of Photo:

Poplar Bluff, MO
unknown
Road No.

unknown
Photographer:

Elvin Klepzig photo
MP MOW Crew and crane Trucks - of the same types seen above. Here they're rerailing MP #5031 (at far right in UP colors) at Poplar Bluff, Missouri.

Unit:

Missouri Pacific
Little Giant Crane
Location/Date of Photo:

Wichita, KS
February 16, 1987
Road No.

RR C12
Photographer:

© Ronald Estes, Rail Images/ T. Greuter Collection
RR C12 - rail-runner crane at snowy Wichita, Kansas on February 16, 1987

Unit:

Missouri Pacific/Union Pacific
Little Giant Crane
Location/Date of Photo:

Union, NE
February 2002
Road No.

RR C25, 1381
Photographer:

Todd Greuter Photo
RR C25, rail-runner crane like above, this time after the UP has applied their shield to its side. Union, Nebraska, February 2002

Unit:

Missouri Pacific/Union Pacific
Little Giant Crane
Location/Date of Photo:

Union, NE
February 2002
Road No.

RR C25, 1381
Photographer:

Todd Greuter Photo
RR C25 - detail shot. Union, Nebraska, February 2002

Unit:

Missouri Pacific/Union Pacific
Little Giant Crane
Location/Date of Photo:

Union, NE
February 2002
Road No.

RR C25, 1381
Photographer:

Todd Greuter Photo
Mo-Pac Little Giant Crane #1381 at Union, Nebraska. Notice that these heavy-duty trucks were even equipped with a rear coupler.

Unit:

Missouri Pacific/Union Pacific
Little Giant Crane
Location/Date of Photo:

Union, NE
February 2002
Road No.

RR C25, 1381
Photographer:

Todd Greuter Photo
MP Little Giant Crane #1381 at Union, Nebraska






The Missouri Pacific system was more than just trains. Far from it. In fact the railroad was part of the larger parent company Missouri Pacific Corporation (ex-Mississippi River Corporation, ex-Mississippi River Fuel Company) which dealt with oil pipelines. Like other railroads that had any hope to remain competitive, the MP system was always eager to stay ahead of the curve and strived to keep abreast of all means of transportation, not just that which ran on rails. The following are some interesting examples of the MoPac's other modes of transportation.


  Missouri Pacific - By Water

Unit:

Missouri-Illinois
Rail car ferry
Location/Date of Photo:

unknown
unknown
Vessel Name:

"Ste Genevieve"
Photographer:

David Beckermann Collection
A rather famous shot of the 3rd "Ste Genevieve", the Missouri-Illinois rail car ferry, which was retired in 1961. The Transfer Boat is seen with a steam engine pulling a cut of cars off the deck. The boat itself has two steam engines, one on each side, with dual paddlewheels.

The MoPac included ferry operations along the Mississippi River, The "George H. Walker" was a large steam-powered twin paddle-driven ferry boat which operated between Baton Rouge and Anchorage, Louisiana. It's use lasted a quarter century, from 1923-1947. From photos, the Walker was aparently capable of hauling twelve cars which where loaded evenly on either end of the deck. Two large smokestacks towered over the deck and each paddlewheel was enclosed with a large buzzsaw emblem painted over the ship's name on the sides. This was the only ferry on the system that regularly scheduled passenger runs as part of it's transport service.



  Missouri Pacific - By Land

Unit:

Missouri Pacific Trailways
GM PD-2903 Bus (1946)
Location/Date of Photo:

unknown
unknown
Road No.

MPT 864
Photographer:

Builder Photo/T. Greuter Collection
A General Motors PD-2903 Bus (1946 model). The Missouri Pacific Transportation Company, Saint Louis, Missouri, was a subsidiary of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, with most of its route miles paralleling the railroad. It provided extensive bus service from Saint Louis to Kansas City, Missouri, Nebraska, Kansas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Memphis, Tennessee and to Houston, Texas, and in the Texas Rio Grande valley. It was an early member of the National Trailways Bus System, later became Midwest Bus Lines and then part of the Continental Trailways Bus System.



  Missouri Pacific - By Air

Unit:

Missouri Pacific
unknown Bi-plane
Location/Date of Photo:

unknown
Late 1920-1930's
Bird No.

unknown
Photographer:

T. Greuter Collection

A company-sponsored bi-plane? - I don't know much about this image, except for the obvious. The photo dates to the late 20's into the 1930's. Did the MoPac use this bird for corporate transportation of company officials or possibly it was experimenting with then new air mail shipping? This image would pre-date the company's excursion into passenger air service.

I've got a different idea. This looks more like a public event such as an airshow, which was a very very popular thing in the early days of flight. Notice the large sign in the crowd to the left. I can't make out all the words but it definitely reads "PILOTS REGISTER... " The bottom line is anyone's guess. With the red buzzsaw logo plastered on wings, fuselage and tail rudder it looks as if the she were about to take off for a dogfight with the Red Baron. There's also at least two other planes in the background. Was the railroad a corporate sponsor in the event, just as you see company logos on NASCAR racers today?

Whatever the occasion, the bi-planes seem to have attracted quite a crowd of gawkers and well-wishers including the mother and daughter posing for the camera. The bi-plane design is interesting itself, with a fully enclosed crew cabin, a state-of-the-art idea for those days, and the stubby lower wing in comparison to the upper assembly suggest it was built for speed and maneuverability.




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