TrainWeb.org Facebook Page
Equipment Rosters: Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal - BEDT / East River Terminal Railroad / Palmers Dock

BROOKLYN EASTERN DISTRICT TERMINAL,
EAST RIVER TERMINAL RAILROAD
& PALMER'S DOCK

.

.

INDEX

            ROSTERS, SPECIFICATIONS & INFORMATION             

for Locomotives, Marine Equipment & Non-Revenue Equipment
including: builder, modification, past & current ownership data:

Steam Locomotive
Overview

Steam Locomotive
Roster

Steam Locomotive
Footnotes

H. K. Porter Catalog
Specification Page

Diesel Locomotive
Overview

Diesel Locomotive
Roster

Diesel Locomotive
Footnotes w/ variant chart

A Visitor to
Kent Avenue

Tugboat
Overview

Tugboat
Roster

Carfloat & Scow
Overview

Carfloat & Scow
Roster

Non-Revenue Equipment
Roster

Misc. Equipment 
Footnotes

Prior Owners of BEDT
Steam Locomotives


                                             IMAGES & FILM                                              

Locomotives:

....

July 2, 1957
Robert B. Hart

ca. 1958-1962
Gerald Landau

[Image]
.

[Image]

[Image]

[Image].

[Image]

[Image]

[Image]

.

 Marine Equipment:

Non-Revenue Equipment:


The above is an author's rendering of the Frederick Havemeyer,
based on a line drawing of a Baldwin Locomotive Works "Steam Dummy" 0-4-0T by Joshua Moldover.

.

While not completely accurate, it does gives the viewer a fairly decent representation of the style of locomotive
utilized by Palmer's Dock and the East River Terminal Railroad at the beginning of operations.


B.E.D.T. Steam Locomotive Movies

   In this chapter, there are now two films (converted to digital format) of the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal in action!


   The first video was originally 16mm with no sound, and taken by Bob Hart on July 2, 1957. I met Mr. Hart at the Clark, NJ "Mother Seton H.S." Train Show on 06 March 2011, and he informed me he had this footage. Mr. Hart mailed me the DVD and I received it 15 March 2011. In this video, we have #11 and #16 in operation.


   The second video clip which was originally 8mm and no sound; was acquired by me back in 2006. It was taken by Gerald Landau, and I acquired it from Norm & Marie Wright. Unfortunately, the date that the original film was "shot" is not known. Upon viewing the video however, #10 is still in service and #11 is already out of service and being cannibalized. This would place the date of the video after September 1958 (when #11 was taken out of service) and before October 1962 (when #10 was taken out of service)
.

   This video shows #10 and #12 in operation with #11 out of service.

....

July 2, 1957
B. Hart

ca. 1958-1962
Gerald Landau

   


return to
Main index
 


Steam Locomotive Overview


   This chapter touches upon the various nuances of the the locomotives used by the BEDT. It will outline similarities and the basic histories of the designs. If you desire "in depth" information of all or any one locomotive, I recommend you visit the roster pages below as well as footnotes, where the technical details and specifications are listed.


   BEDT operated a fleet of compact but powerful Steam Locomotives known as "sidetankers" and "saddletankers". These locomotives were also known as "Drill Engines", "Docksiders", and in Europe, they are known as "Tank Engines"; (e.g: Thomas the Tank Engine). Over the period of its 113 year existence, Palmer's Dock, East River Terminal and the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal would come to own sixteen steam locomotives, comprised of 0-4-0T and 0-6-0T side and saddletankers:

  Frederick Havemeyer, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, #7, #8, #9, #10, #11, #12, #13, #14, #15, and #16


   
All of BEDT's locomotives had the distinction of being able to operate without a tender (as all tank engines do). As regular steam locomotives hauled a tender behind the engine which carried fuel (wood, coal or oil) and water for the locomotive. Since operating space on carfloats and the tight radii (curves) of yard & street trackage was at a premium, a small bunker on the rear of the locomotive carried the fuel and a water tank was mounted on the sides of, or "draped" over the top of the boiler (like a horse saddle); hence the name "saddletank".

   Furthermore, as the locomotives were to remain within a short distance to the shop, they could be refueled more frequently, and therefore it was not necessary for the locomotive to carry a large supply of fuel and / or water as it would  have to were it to go long distances between refueling. Lots of yard and shop locomotives for the larger railroads used this saddletank arrangement to much success. Due to this configuration, unlike conventional steam locomotives which required a engineer to run the locomotive and a fireman to feed fuel, the oil fired steam switchers used on the BEDT were equipped for one man operation.


   The earliest of these locomotives ("Frederick Havemeyer", and #2 through 7) that ran for Palmer's Dock, East River Terminal and then the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal, as stated earlier; were equipped with dummy street car shells over the locomotive. Hence the name "Dummy Engines", "Street Dummies" or "Steam Dummies". This design was to prevent frightening of horses, as horses were supposedly comfortable with and used to streetcars / trolleys, but were easily frightened by steam locomotives. Go figure! Naturally as automobiles replaces horses, (and as cars aren't afraid of steam locomotives) the street dummies were no longer necessary.


   It is now known, by referencing the image of the East River Terminal / Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal that appeared in April 6, 1914 issue of "Greater New York" (a weekly bulletin published by the Merchants Association of New York); a locomotive can be seen without the street car shell operating for the East River Terminal Railroad / Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal. Whether all of the ERT / BEDT locomotives had their street car shells removed by this date, or only a select few retained their street car shells and likewise to what date, remains undetermined at this time. This image may be viewed in the East River Terminal chapter on the main website under the subchapter "ERT Property Photo".


   Also recently discovered; if one takes the time to compare the Baldwin builder photo of BEDT #11 and then the picture directly below it; you will notice that in the builders photo, #11 has a short style open topped coal bunker. In the second photo, it is clearly obvious that #11 had been modified to have a tall style closed top bunker to hold oil! Likewise, the picture of #8 shows her being scrapped as a coal burner in 1933. Yet the photo of #7 has a high style oil bunker at the same usage period (1933/1934). The photo of #9 as well shows a tall style oil bunker, yet was built prior to #10 and #11; of which #11 was already discussed being seen with both coal and oil.


   So, all things being considered, Baldwin built locomotives "Frederick Havemeyer", and 2 through 11 appear to have been originally built by Baldwin as coal fired; and at the least, numbers 6, 7, 9, 10 & 11 were converted to burn oil by BEDT (with 8 being scrapped as a coal burner) sometime after the turn of the century.


   H. K. Porter Boiler Record documents recently coming to light, show that H. K. Porter built numbers 12 and 13 (c/n 6368 and 6369) were built as coal fired for their first owner, the US Navy Fleet Supply Base in South Brooklyn (not the Navy Yard). As some point in their life, most likely (but unconfirmed) they were converted to oil when BEDT purchased them circa 1931. Numbers 14 and 15 ,were built as coal fired and converted to oil fired by BEDT when they were purchased as well. The builders picture of #16 shows a tapered style coal bunker as well. Considering that Astoria Light, Heat & Power utilized coal for their gasification plants, it only seem logical their locomotives were fired by coal as well, but it is unknown whether it was converted to oil fired by it's second owner (Fleischmanns Yeast of Peekskill, NY) or by BEDT. In all likelihood, the locomotive was converted by BEDT as they had the experienced shop forces to modify the locomotive.


   The BEDT steam locomotives that were converted to burn oil, utilized Bunker-C oil. While Bunker-C is considered a "heavy" type of oil, (when compared to #2 fuel oil or diesel fuel), there is a sound reasoning for it's use. The second generation of steam powered tugboats of which the BEDT operated ,were also fired with Bunker-C. It was cheap and widely available, so it was naturally cost efficient to run all the equipment tugboats and locomotives alike, with one fuel. The use of Bunker-C oil in their locomotives also allowed the railroads to eliminate the fireman's position in locomotive operation, as an employee was no longer needed to shovel coal into the firebox. The oil could be controlled via the use of simple valves.


    Bunker Fuel received its name from the containers or tanks on ships which are known as "Bunkers", of which the fuel is stored in. In the days of steam power, the bunkers originally held coal, and these bunkers were either converted by enclosing or built from the start to hold liquid fuel as those liquid fuels became more common. Bunker-C oil, which got its name from the Navy fuel specification, is also known as "Number 6 Fuel Oil", "Residual Fuel Oil (RFO)", or by the Pacific Specification of "PS-400".


   A residual oil is an oil product that remains after the more valuable "cuts" of crude oil such as naphtha, gasoline, etc; have boiled off. This oil residue may contain various undesirable impurities including 2 percent water and ½ percent mineral soil.
Residual oils also contain relatively high amounts of pollutants, particularly sulfur; which forms sulfur dioxide upon combustion. Despite this, Bunker-C oil Fuel was still cleaner burning than coal. Even due to those undesirable properties, Bunker Fuels are very cheap, and in fact it is the cheapest liquid fuel available.


   Bunker-C oil must be pre-heated to 150 °F to 250 °F before it can be pumped easily. This requires a correctly designed system for storage, pumping and burning, as in cooler temperatures the Bunker-C oil can congeal into a tar-like semi-solid. Keeping Bunker-C Fuel flowing is usually accomplished by a recirculated low pressure steam system which pre-heated the fuel to allow it flow easier.


   This necessary pre-heating precluded this fuels' use in smaller vehicles such as automobiles or boats, as the pre-heating equipment would take up valuable space and make the vehicle heavier. Therefore, Bunker-C oil was better suited as a fuel for steam boilers (for making heat and/or generating electricity), steamships, and steam locomotives. As these large applications both generated heat and could take that heat from the combustion process to heat the fuel prior to firing and if necessary, be large enough to house the pre-heating equipment and piping necessary for keeping Bunker-C oil fluid, it was a sensible fuel choice. The BEDT had a small steam powered boilerhouse just outside the enginehouse, for both steam heating of the enginehouse, and to provide steam so the Bunker-C storage cars could be kept warm as well.


   By comparison, while Bunker-C oil releases up to 11% more BTU's (British Thermal Units) than the equivalent amount of Number 2 Fuel Oil; Number 2 Fuel Oil does not need to be pre-heated, so it is better suited for use as a fuel for smaller, more mobile applications; such as diesel-electric locomotives, cars, trucks and smaller marine vessels. As Number 2 Fuel Oil is also cleaner burning as it is more refined the Bunker C oil, it releases less pollutants than Bunker-C; and this helped lead to the elimination of Bunker-C Fuel as a locomotive fuel.


   Despite the disadvantages; the use of Bunker-C by the BEDT must have been a consideration through the 1950's, as the BEDT continued to fire their steam switchers on Bunker-C oil even when diesel locomotives were gaining popularity. But, once the newer tugboats equipped with diesel engines arrived, the diesel-electric locomotives couldn't be far behind, and eventually found their way to the BEDT in 1962.


   
   Also of interest is the fact that BEDT shops did almost all of their own repairs on the locomotives with few and far between exceptions. 


   Short of heavy repairs such as a new firebox, it is now obvious that BEDT's mechanical shop forces were experienced, knowledgeable and equipped for most steam locomotive repairs. Several photos now part of this websites collection, show different locomotives in various states of disassembly, repair & refurbishment.


   Mechanically speaking, it appears the BEDT steam locomotives were extremely well maintained right up until the end of steam locomotive operations. No spit & baling wire repairs or leaky, wheezy steam chests or cylinders on this equipment!


   Nor was the paint ever flaking or faded, nor were there broken windows in the cabs. Obviously not only were locomotives well maintained mechanically, but superficially as well. Even during the declining rail traffic years of the 1970's, the diesel locomotives were mechanically in good repair.


#15 - April 1961
D. Plowden photo
.


#13 - ca. 1958
unknown photographer (B. Stiles?)
authors collection

.


unknown date - Presumably taken January 1963
when #14 was last shopped by BEDT for 23B and Hydrostatic tests.
Note: no tires!
unknown photographer
G. Mahlkov collection


unknown date - Presumably taken January 1963
when #14 was last shopped by BEDT for 23B and Hydrostatic tests.
Note new tires
A. Huneke photo
A. Huneke collection

..


#16 - unknown date - stripped down to boiler and running gear.
S. Meyers photo
D. Keller archives
authors collection

   .

   Referencing the image immediately above, BEDT maintenance records reflect that #16 received flues, lagging, hydrostatic test and 23B on March 1, 1962. As Interstate Commerce Commission regulations require inspections and maintenance every four years, therefore it would make sense that #16 would have been shopped four years prior in 1958. As the bottom of the saddletank is still round in the second photo below, it is believed that the photos are of the locomotive being overhauled in late 1958 or early 1959, as it was at this time around 1960 that the square bottoms on the saddletank were welded on.


S. Meyers photo
D. Keller archives
authors collection

   These locomotives appear to be efficient as well, because if you take note; there are very few images of the locomotives showing smoke, and consider that we've all seen "modern" diesel switchers and road engines from Class 1 railroads with more emissions!


   Until that sad and fateful day that the diesels took over, BEDT enjoyed the use of steam locomotives later than any other railroad in the Northeast (for everyday freight hauling), with steam locomotive operations officially concluding on October 25, 1963. When you take into consideration that New York City essentially banned the use of steam locomotives within the city limits in 1923, one must wonder how BEDT kept steam locomotive operations around for so long!   


   Needless to say, the BEDT with it's late usage of steam locomotives, its easy metropolitan access and railfan friendly atmosphere made it very popular with railfans and photographers. Try that now in this age of homeland security paranoia! Just imagine; taking pictures of steam locomotives all day, then "jumping" across the Williamsburg Bridge to get a salami on club and Dr. Browns black cherry soda at Katz's Delicatessen.


   I also am left to wonder, if BEDT had survived long enough to benefit from TOFC (Trailer on Flat Car) and COFC (Container on Flat Car) traffic, would the venture be known as "BEDTIME"? Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal InterModal Exchange - get it? Haha!  :o)  


   Unfortunately, all Baldwin built sidetankers (the F. Havemeyer, and numbers 2 through 11) were scrapped by BEDT, with 10 & 11 being scrapped as late as 1962 and 1963. However; the remaining five H. K. Porter built locomotives (numbers 12 through 16) have all been saved and subsequently sold into private hands, and are currently in various states of restoration, storage and display. One (#15) is even in operation at Strasburg RR "dressed" as Thomas the Tank Engine !

   


return to
Main index
 


Palmer's Dock / East River Terminal / Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal
Steam Locomotive Roster

Specifications, Locations & Owner Information, Condition & Restoration Reports

Click on number plates below the data to view images of that locomotive!


I have yet to find ANY photographs of the Frederick Havemeyer, or #2 through 5 anywhere in either
Palmer's Dock, East River Terminal or Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal markings.
If you have a picture or image of the Frederick Havemeyer, or numbers 2, 3, 4 or 5
that you can share or any picture of ERT / BEDT locomotives,
I'll be pleased to place on this website with all due credit & provenance. Thank You!

P. D. / E. R. T. #1 - "Frederick C. Havemeyer"

Builder & Location: Baldwin Locomotive Works
Serial Number: 3801
Build Date: December 1875
Wheel Arrangement: 0-4-0T Steam Dummy

Cylinders:

17" x 24"
Weight: 68,000 lbs.
Boiler Pressure:
Wheel Diameter: 45"
Tractive Effort:
Water Tank Capacity:
Boiler Capacity:
Coal Capacity:
Owner History:

Palmers Dock,
Havemeyer & Elder? (no number)
ERT ?
Present Location: scrapped unknown date
Condition:
Notes: built as 6' gauge, regauged for Palmer's Dock.
on BEDT property in 1927, retired prior to 1933

.

SORRY,
NO PHOTOS
.

.

return to
Main index
 


P. D. / E. R. T #2 - "Florence"

Builder & Location: Baldwin Locomotive Works
Serial Number: 7596
Build Date: May 1885
Wheel Arrangement: 0-4-0T Steam Dummy

Cylinders:

17" x 24"
Weight: 68,000 lbs.
Boiler Pressure:
Wheel Diameter: 46"
Tractive Effort:
Water Tank Capacity:
Boiler Capacity:
Coal Capacity:
Owner History:
Palmer's Dock Co. #2
East River Terminal #2
Present Location: scrapped unknown date
Condition:
Notes: on BEDT property in 1927, retired prior to 1933

.

SORRY,
NO PHOTOS
.

.

return to
Main index
 


P. D. / E. R. T #3 - "Grace"

Builder & Location: Baldwin Locomotive Works
Serial Number: 8746
Build Date: August 1887
Wheel Arrangement: 0-4-0T Steam Dummy

Cylinders:

17" x 24"
Weight: 68,000 lbs.
Boiler Pressure:
Wheel Diameter: 46"
Tractive Effort:
Water Tank Capacity:
Boiler Capacity:
Coal Capacity:
Owner History:
Palmer's Dock Co.#3
East River Terminal #3
Present Location: scrapped unknown date
Condition:
Notes: on BEDT property in 1927, retired prior to 1933

.

SORRY,
NO PHOTOS
.

.

return to
Main index
 


P. D. / E. R. T #4 - "Lily"

Builder & Location: Baldwin Locomotive Works
Serial Number: 11439
Build Date: December 1890
Wheel Arrangement: 0-4-0T Steam Dummy

Cylinders:

17" x 24"
Weight: 68,000 lbs.
Boiler Pressure:
Wheel Diameter: 46"
Tractive Effort:
Water Tank Capacity:
Boiler Capacity:
Coal Capacity:
Owner History:
Palmer's Dock Co. #4
East River Terminal #4
Present Location: scrapped unknown date
Condition:
Notes: on BEDT property in 1927, retired prior to 1933

.

SORRY,
NO PHOTOS
.

.

return to
Main index
 


P. D. / E. R. T #5 - "Arthur"

Builder & Location: Baldwin Locomotive Works
Serial Number: 11982
Build Date: June 1891
Wheel Arrangement: 0-4-0T Steam Dummy

Cylinders:

17" x 24"
Weight: 68,000 lbs.
Boiler Pressure:
Wheel Diameter: 46"
Tractive Effort:
Water Tank Capacity:
Boiler Capacity:
Coal Capacity:
Owner History:
Palmer's Dock Co. #5
East River Terminal #5
Present Location: scrapped unknown date
Condition:
Notes: on BEDT property in 1927, retired prior to 1933

.

SORRY,
NO PHOTOS
.

.

return to
Main index
 


P. D. / E.R.T / B.E.D.T. #6 - "Ethel"

Builder & Location: Baldwin Locomotive Works
Serial Number: 14743
Build Date: March 1896
Wheel Arrangement: 0-4-0T  Steam Dummy (converted to saddletank)

Cylinders:

17" x 24"
Weight: 78,000 lbs.
Boiler Pressure:
Wheel Diameter: 46"
Tractive Effort:
Water Tank Capacity:
Boiler Capacity:
Coal capacity:
Owner History:

Palmer's Dock Co.  #6
East River Terminal #6
Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal #6
Present Location: scrapped unknown date
Condition:
Notes:

built as a Steam Dummy,
rebuilt as a low style 3/4 saddletank 1918
on BEDT property as of September 1933
retired between 1933 and 1936

[Image]

.

.

return to
Main index
 


P. D. / E.R.T. / B.E.D.T. #7 - "Chester"

Builder & Location: Baldwin Locomotive Works
Serial Number: 17890
Build Date: September 1900
Wheel Arrangement: 0-6-0T

Cylinders:

17" x 24"
Weight: 102,000 lbs
Boiler Pressure:
Wheel Diameter: 46"
Tractive Effort:
Water Tank Capacity:
Boiler Capacity:
Fuel Capacity: 1300 lbs coal, 500 gals oil (est after conversion)
Owner History:

Palmer's Dock Co. #7
East River Terminal #7
Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal #7
Present Location: scrapped unknown date
Condition:
Notes: in service as of January 1947
built as Steam Dummy
rebuilt as square sided saddletank

[Image]

.

.

return to
Main index
 


P. D. / E.R.T. / B.E.D.T. #8 - "Carleton"

Builder & Location: Baldwin Locomotive Works
Serial Number: 18145
Build Date: September 1890
Wheel Arrangement: 0-6-0T

Cylinders:

19" x 24"
Weight: 102,000 lbs.
Boiler Pressure:
Wheel Diameter: 46"
Tractive Effort:
Water Tank Capacity:
Boiler Capacity:
Coal Capacity:
Owner History:

Palmer's Dock Co. #8
East River Terminal #8
Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal #8
Present Location: scrapped unknown date
Condition:
Notes:

on BEDT property as late as September 1933
retired between 1933 and 1936
built as Steam Dummy
unknown if rebuilt; if so, most likely had same "low style" 3/4 saddletank as #6

[Image]

.

.

return to
Main index
 


E. R. T. / B. E. D. T. #9

Builder & Location: Baldwin Locomotive Works
Serial Number: 29543
Build Date: November 1906
Wheel Arrangement: 0-6-0T

Cylinders:

19" x 24"
Weight: 102,000 lbs
Boiler Pressure: 180 psi
Wheel Diameter: 46"
Tractive Effort: 28,954 lbs
Water Tank Capacity: 1500 gal
Boiler Capacity: 1200 gal
Fuel Capacity: 1300 lbs coal, 500 gals oil (est after conversion)
Owner History:

Havemeyer & Elder #9
East River Terminal #9
Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal #9
Present Location: scrapped unknown date
Condition:
Notes:
in service as late as October 1934
retired between 1934 and 1936
built as round saddletank?
converted to square sided saddletank by BEDT

[Image]

.

.

return to
Main index
 


B. E. D. T. #10

Builder & Location: Baldwin Locomotive Works (Philadelphia, PA)
Construction Number: 39696
Build Date: April 1913


Baldwin Locomotive class 6-32-D 1035 - "Six Coupled Tank Locomotive"


Wheel Arrangement:

0-6-0T

Water Tank Capacity:

1450 gal

Firebox Area

129 sq. ft.
Cylinders: 19"d x 24"s Boiler Capacity: 1200 gal Firebox Dim. 93 3/16" x 33 3/8"
Boiler Pressure: 180 psi Boiler Dia. 58" Firebox Depth 58" f,  57" r
Weight: 125,100 lbs Coal Capacity: 1300 lbs Tubes Dia. 1 3/4"
Length: 29' 0" Fuel Oil Capacity (after conv) 500 gal Tube Length 9' 4 1/2"
Height: Tractive Effort: 28,800 lbs # of Tubes 220
Wheel Diameter: 46" Factor of Adhesion: Tube Area 937 sq. ft.
Wheelbase: 8' 0"  Sharpest curve, advised: Grate Area 21.6 sq ft
Valve Type:

Balanced Slide

Sharpest curve, practicable: Staying Crown Bar
Lightest rail usage, advised:

Owner History: BEDT
Present Location: scrapped April - July 1963.....................................................
Notes:
built as round saddletank, closed cab (see steam loco notes)
converted to square sided saddletank by BEDT

.

.

return to
Main index
 


B. E. D. T. #11

Builder & Location: Baldwin Locomotive Works (Eddystone, PA)
Construction Number 55276
Build Date: February 1922


Baldwin Locomotive class 6-32-D 1150  - "Six Coupled Tank Locomotive"

Wheel Arrangement: 0-6-0T Water Tank Capacity: 1450 gal Firebox Area 129 sq. ft.
Cylinders: 19"d x 24"s Boiler Capacity: 1200 gal Firebox Dim. 93 3/16" L x 33 1/4" W
Boiler Pressure: 180 psi Coal Capacity: 1300 lbs Firebox Depth 58" F,  57" R
Weight: 125,000 lbs Fuel Oil Capacity (after conv) 500 gal Tubes Dia. 1 3/4"
Length: 29' 0" Tractive Effort: 28,800 lbs Tube Length 9' 4 1/2"
Height: Factor of Adhesion: # of Tubes 220
Wheel Diameter: 46" Sharpest curve, advised: Tube Area 937 sq. ft.
Wheelbase:

8' 0" 

Sharpest curve, practicable: Grate Area 21.6 sq ft
Valve Type: Balanced Slide Lightest rail usage, advised: Staying Radial

Owner History: BEDT
Condition: scrapped BEDT July 1962.....................................................
Notes: built as round saddletank, open cab (see steam loco notes)
converted to square sided saddletank by BEDT

.

.

return to
Main index
 




B. E. D. T. #12

Builder & Location: H. K. Porter (Pittsburgh, PA)
Serial Number: 6368
Build Date: March 1919


Wheel Arrangement:

0-6-0T

Boiler Capacity:

1200 gal

Hauling Capacity

grade

extra good
track

average
track

Wheel Diameter: 46" Boiler Pressure: 180 psi

(in tons)

level 3915 2520
Wheelbase: 11' 0"  Tube Diameter: 2"

¼ % 2185 1660
Weight: 128,000 lbs Tube Length: 9' 6" ½ % 1500 1230
Fuel Tank Capacity: 500 gal # of  Tubes: 202 1 % 910 795
Water Tank Capacity: 1800 gal Tractive Effort: 25,865 lbs

2 % 490 450
Length: 29' 0" Factor of Adhesion: 4.86

3 % 325 305
Height: 14' 6" Cylinders: 18"d x 24"s

Sharpest curve, advised:

180' radius
Valve Type: Balanced Slide

Sharpest curve, practicable:

100' radius

  Lightest rail usage, advised: 70 lbs per yd

Owner History: 3/1919 -    1922:  US Navy Fleet Supply Base - South Brooklyn Section #3  (Brooklyn, NY)
   1922 - 6/1963:  BEDT #12   (Brooklyn, NY)
6/1963 - 3/1971:  Ron Ziel   (New York, NY)
3/1971 -     ?     :  Robert Most   (Tampa, FL)
Present Location: Florida Rail Road Museum, Parrish, FL
Condition: painted and lettered in BEDT! (5/2010)
non-running display
Notes: H. K. Porter "Heavy" side-tank model

Builders identical twin to #13 and US Navy Fleet Supply Base - South Brooklyn Section
# 1 (c/n 6366) & #2 (c/n 6367) (all have consecutive SN's)

BEDT documents dated June 24, 1963 state #12 was already sold for undisclosed 
amount in June of 1963.

Non-BEDT documents show R. Ziel purchased #12, (confirmed) for the anticipated
"Sag Harbor and Scuttle Hole Rail Road" (which never coalesced).

Ron Ziel confirms he purchased #12 in June 1963 for the sum of $900.

Popularly (but erroneously) believed to have been a Brooklyn Navy Yard locomotive.
It did operate in Brooklyn, NY; but at the Fleet Supply Base, not the Navy Yard.

.

.

return to
Main index
 




B. E. D. T. #13

Builder & Location: H. K. Porter (Pittsburgh, PA)
Serial Number: 6369
Build Date: March 1919


Wheel Arrangement:

0-6-0T

Boiler Capacity:

1200 gal

Hauling Capacity

grade

extra good
track

average
track

Wheel Diameter: 46" Boiler Pressure: 180 psi

(in tons)

level 3915 2520
Wheelbase: 11' 0"  Tube Diameter: 2"

¼ % 2185 1660
Weight: 128,000 lbs Tube Length: 9' 6" ½ % 1500 1230
Fuel Tank Capacity: 500 gal # of  Tubes: 202 1 % 910 795
Water Tank Capacity: 1800 gal Tractive Effort: 25,865 lbs

2 % 490 450
Length: 29' 0" Factor of Adhesion: 4.86

3 % 325 305
Height: 14' 6" Cylinders: 18"d x 24"s

Sharpest curve, advised:

180' radius
Valve Type: Balanced Slide

Sharpest curve, practicable:

100' radius

  Lightest rail usage, advised: 70 lbs per yd

Owner History:   3/1919 - 1922:            US Navy Fleet Supply Base - South Brooklyn Section #4  (Brooklyn, NY)
     1922 - 1963:            BEDT #13   (Brooklyn, NY)
10/1963 - 1/1977:         Rail Tours Inc.   (York, PA)
  1/1977 - 12/15/2011:  Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania   (Strasburg, PA)
Present Location: Age Of Steam Roundhouse, (J. Jacobsen), Sugarcreek, OH
Condition: painted, unlettered, non-running display - possible return to operation as yard goat
Notes: H. K. Porter "Heavy" side-tank model

Builders identical twin to #12 and US Navy Fleet Supply Base - South Brooklyn Section
   #1 (c/n 6366) & #2 (c/n 6367) (all have consecutive SN's)

BEDT documents dated June 24, 1963 request $2,500 asking price of #13.

Non-BEDT documents show #13 was sold to G. Hart. Moved to Reading, PA; 1968

One of the driver tires from No. 13 now serves as a fire bell hanger at the front entrance
   of the Chalfont Fire Company in Chalfont, PA.

Popularly (but erroneously) believed to have been a Brooklyn Navy Yard locomotive.
It did operate in Brooklyn, NY; but at the Fleet Supply Base, not the Navy Yard.

.

.

return to
Main index
 


B. E. D. T. #14

Builder & Location: H. K. Porter (Pittsburgh, PA)
Serial Number: 6260
Build Date: August 1920


Wheel Arrangement:

0-6-0T

Boiler Capacity:

1200 gal

Hauling Capacity

grade

extra good
track

average
track

Wheel Diameter: 46" Boiler Pressure: 180 psi

(in tons)

level 3915 2520
Wheelbase: 11' 0"  Tube Diameter: 2"

¼ % 2185 1660
Weight: 128,000 lbs Tube Length: 9' 6" ½ % 1500 1230
Fuel Tank Capacity: 500 gal # of  Tubes: 202 1 % 910 795
Water Tank Capacity: 1800 gal Tractive Effort: 25,865 lbs

2 % 490 450
Length: 29' 0" Factor of Adhesion: 4.86

3 % 325 305
Height: 14' 6" Cylinders: 18"d x 24"s

Sharpest curve, advised:

180' radius
Valve Type: Balanced Slide

Sharpest curve, practicable:

100' radius

  Lightest rail usage, advised: 70 lbs per yd

Owner History:      8/1920 - 1935:  Mesta Machine Works #5   (West Homestead, PA)
        1935 - 1935:  Birmingham Rail & Locomotive Co.   (Birmingham, AL)  (supplier & broker)
2/18/1935 - 1963:  BEDT #14   (Brooklyn, NY)
        1964 - 1965:  Maryland & Pennsylvania #14 [Railtours]   (York, PA)
        1965 - 1993:  Black River & Western #14   (Ringoes, NJ)
Present Location: Ulster & Delaware RR Historical Society, (Arkville, NY)
Condition: under cosmetic restoration, restoration to operation pending funding.
Notes: H. K. Porter "Medium" saddle-tank model
("3/4 length" saddletank)

Suffered firebox explosion in 1953 (see loco footnotes)

BEDT documents dated June 24, 1963 request $9,500 asking price of #14.

Non-BEDT documents (5/90 issue of Semaphore) shows #14 was sold to E. Bernard.
   This is not correct, as this engine was sold to George Hart (with #13) for use
   on Maryland & Pennsylvania. Copies of RRM of PA records confirm this.

After leaving BEDT property, an air pump was added to the left side of smokebox by M&P

Also, data shows #14 was refitted with 44" drivers. 
   This info is erroneous. Actual measurements of the wheels show true 46" diameter,
   which is correct for this type Porter locomotive with 18" x 24" cylinders.
   (as per 1943 HK Porter tractive force / boiler pressure / driving wheel size tables)

.

.

return to
Main index
 


B. E. D. T. #15

Builder & Location: H. K. Porter (Pittsburgh, PA)
Serial Number: 5966
Build Date: March 1917


Wheel Arrangement:

0-6-0T

Boiler Capacity:

1200 gal

Hauling Capacity

grade

extra good
track

average
track

Wheel Diameter: 46" Boiler Pressure: 180 psi

(in tons)

level 3915 2520
Wheelbase: 11' 0"  Tube Diameter: 2"

¼ % 2185 1660
Weight: 128,000 lbs Tube Length: 9' 6" ½ % 1500 1230
Fuel Tank Capacity: 500 gal # of  Tubes: 202 1 % 910 795
Water Tank Capacity: 1800 gal Tractive Effort: 25,865 lbs

2 % 490 450
Length: 29' 0" Factor of Adhesion: 4.86

3 % 325 305
Height: 14' 6" Cylinders: 18"d x 24"s

Sharpest curve, advised:

180' radius
Valve Type: Balanced Slide

Sharpest curve, practicable:

100' radius

  Lightest rail usage, advised: 70 lbs per yd

Owner History: 3/1917  -    ?   :  Mesta Machine Works   (West Homestead, PA)   (number unknown - most likely #4)
        ?   - 1965:  BEDT #15   (Brooklyn, NY)
    1965 - 1975:  South Appalachia Rwy #15   (Burnsville, NC)
    1975 - 1998:  Toledo, Lake Erie & Western #15   (Grand Rapids, OH)
Present Location: Thomas the Tank Engine #1 (operational), Strasburg RR   (Strasburg, PA)
Condition: only BEDT loco currently under steam. #15 was completely stripped, rebuilt,
converted to coal firing and side tank, and cosmetically altered to resemble Thomas the Tank Engine.
Notes: H. K. Porter "Medium" saddle-tank model
("3/4 length" saddletank)

Oldest of the surviving BEDT locos,

Rounded bottom of saddletank repaired / modified with square "skirt"
(out of service March 8, 1962 - May 31, 1962)

BEDT documents dated June 24, 1963 request $5,000 asking price of #15.

Non-BEDT documents (5/90 issue of Semaphore) shows #15 was sold to G. Hart as well.
This is incorrect, as this engine was sold to Edward Bernard for use on South Appalachian Rwy.

Sometime after leaving BEDT property, an air pump was added
   to the left side of smokebox.

Sold 1975 to Toledo, Lake Erie & Western, in Ohio.

Sold by Keith Brigode in 3/1998 to Strasburg Railroad Corp.;
   Arrived SRC 5/9/98. Was oil-fired, converted to coal; renumbered as Thomas #1.
   Locomotive was modified extensively to resemble Thomas the Tank Engine.
   Cosmetic conversion completed 9/1998; Mechanical rebuilding completed 4/1999;
   Locomotive first test-fired on 4/14/1999; Test run 4/29/1999. In service.

.

.

return to
Main index
 


B. E. D. T. #16

Builder & Location: H. K. Porter (Pittsburgh, PA)
Serial Number: 6780
Build Date: January 1923


Wheel Arrangement:

0-6-0T

Boiler Capacity:

1200 gal

Hauling Capacity

grade

extra good
track

average
track

Wheel Diameter: 46" Boiler Pressure: 180 psi

(in tons)

level 3915 2520
Wheelbase: 11' 0"  Tube Diameter: 2"

¼ % 2185 1660
Weight: 128,000 lbs Tube Length: 9' 6" ½ % 1500 1230
Fuel Tank Capacity: 500 gal # of  Tubes: 202 1 % 910 795
Water Tank Capacity: 1800 gal Tractive Effort: 25,865 lbs

2 % 490 450
Length: 29' 0" Factor of Adhesion: 4.86

3 % 325 305
Height: 14' 6" Cylinders: 18"d x 24"s

Sharpest curve, advised:

180' radius
Valve Type: Balanced Slide

Sharpest curve, practicable:

100' radius

  Lightest rail usage, advised: 70 lbs per yd

Owner History: 1/1923       -       ?   :  Astoria Light, Heat & Power #5,   (Queens, NY)
       ?         -       ?   :  Fleischmanns Transportation,   (Peekskill, NY)  (number unknown)
       ?         -    1939:  Birmingham Rail & Locomotive Co.   (Birmingham, AL)  (supplier & broker)
1//13/1939 -    1963:  BEDT #16   (Brooklyn, NY) (operational until 1963)
         1963 -    1983:  George Foster - stored on BEDT property (Brooklyn, NY)
         1983 -    1993:  abandoned in place, former BEDT property
         1993 - 1/1999:  moved & stored at NY Cross Harbor enginehouse Bush Terminal (Brooklyn, NY)
Present Location: Railroad Museum of Long Island, Riverhead, NY
Condition: non-running display; running gear removed, missing mainrods. 2010 plans are to reassemble loco.
anticipated cosmetic restoration,
Notes: H. K. Porter "Heavy" saddle-tank model
("full length" saddletank - one of a kind on BEDT)

Youngest of the surviving BEDT locos,

Rounded bottom of saddletank repaired / modified with square "skirt" between 6/1959 & 10/1960

BEDT documents dated June 24, 1963 request $7,000 asking price of #16.

Non-BEDT documents (5/90 issue of Semaphore) show #16 was sold to a G. Foster,
   then resold, then (erroneously) state it was scrapped!

In actuality, #16 had been sold to George Foster, for use in conjunction with BEDT #12 &
   Ron Ziel's Sag Harbor & Scuttle Hole operation; but was never removed from
   the Kent Ave. property and was abandoned in place when BEDT ceased operations in 1983.
   It remained there until late 1993, at which time #16 was brought to NY Cross Harbor RR
   for cosmetic restoration.

From the time of move from Kent Avenue and during restoration in NY Cross Harbor shops,
   Robert Diamond (of BHRA) claims ownership. Mr. Diamond was kind enough to send a copy of
   receipt from owner of Kent Avenue property authorizing #16 to be moved by Mr. Diamond and
   transfers ownership of #16 to Mr. Diamond. According to Mr. Diamond, sometime after 
   restoration and "unveiling" in 1993, NYCH donated #16 without his consent. 

According to sources at the Trolley Museum of New York in Kingston, they were supposed to
   acquire it. Unfortunately, the TMNY could not fund the rigging and move from Brooklyn
   to Kingston, so #16 was offered by NYCH to Friends of Locomotive 35 in Oyster Bay, which
   accepted it. However, it was allegedly brought to the RR Museum of Long Island in Riverhead in error,
   but has remained at that location as their project.

New information states #16 was NOT brought to Riverhead in error, but was sent there intentionally with
   the knowledge of Friends of Loco #35, as a RR Museum of LI banner was hung
   on 16 during it's move.

.

.

return to
Main index
 


Steam Locomotive Footnotes


Numbering / Age New vs. Preowned Fuels & Conversions Cab Styles
Wheel Arrangement Driver Diameters Flanges Switch De-icers
Couplers Brakes Footboards Saddletank Repairs / Styles

#14 Temporary Pilot

#14 Lettering #14 Firebox Explosion Locomotive Collision?

.

.

Numbering / Age

Baldwin built #8 was built before and is chronologically older that #7, even though it was assigned a higher road number.

H. K. Porter construction numbers and dates are out of sequence for #12, 13 and 14:
#12 and #13 were both built 3/1919 and are numbered 6368 and 6369 respectively.
#14 was built over a year later in 8/1920; yet has a lower construction number of 6260.
This data is accurate upon referencing H. K. Porter build records.

H. K. Porter built numbers 12, 13, 14, 15 are chronologically older the Baldwin built number 11.

.

.

New vs. Pre-Owned Locomotive Purchases

Baldwin built locomotives, "Frederick C. Havemeyer" through number 11, were purchased new.

H. K. Porter built locomotives, numbers 12 through 16, were purchased pre-owned.

All locomotives were owned by the Havemeyer & Elder Co. Inc, (parent company) and were leased to the East River Terminal Railroad or Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal for exclusive operation.

.

.

Fuel & Fuel Conversions

A copy of a H. K. Porter Boiler Records was recently sent to me by Robert Brendel. This document shows #12 and 13 were built as coal fired. This document now opens the proverbial can of worms, as to at what time or with which owner had #12 and #13 converted to oil.

I have also come across a document from George Hart dated 1967, that he understands that #14 was converted to oil from coal in 1935 or 1936 (about the time BEDT acquired the locomotives). No other documentation exists regarding these conversions nor has any resemblance or remnants of an ash pan been seen on 14. However, the firebox bottom currently in place is of welded construction, and not cast steel like the surrounding flange or other fixtures under the locomotive. This firebox bottom is attached to the frame with a number of bolts around the perimeter of the firebox and appears to be removable.

The builders picture of #16 (as Astoria Light, Heat and Power #5) shows a tapered style coal bunker as well. Considering Astoria Light, Heat & Power utilized coal for their gasification plants, it only seem logical the locomotive was fired by coal as well when operated by them.

.

.

Cabs

.

.
Wheel Arrangements

.
.

.

.
Driver Diameters

Many published and internet documents state that H. K. Porter built locomotives #12 through 16 had 40" drivers.
The H.K. Porter catalog calls for 46" drivers for this model locomotive with this corresponding cylinder size, boiler pressure and traction effort combinations.

BEDT maintenance records for BEDT steam locomotives prior to 1963 show 46" diameter, but the BEDT steam locomotive sales prospectus dated 1963 has that 40" measurement.

Current measurements of #13, #14 and #16 show 44.5" (allowance for wear), 46" and 46" respectively.


It is concluded that 46" drivers are the correct size and that the locomotive specifications and information published since 1963 by various historians was unfortunately referenced & copied from that erroneous BEDT document and handed down through the years, and are incorrect since that 1963 document.

.

.

..

Flanges

.

..
.

Switch De-icers

Thanks to the keen eyes of Paul Strubeck, there are what appears to be steam jets on the front of locomotives #12, 13 and 16.

These steam jet affairs appear to be plumbed into a steam line and were aimed at the rails just in front of the steam chest. Two photos of #16 in February 1961 show massive amounts of steam issuing out from under the locomotive. It is believed that these were used for deicing switch points with live steam.


Further review of pictures in this websites archives, show that these steam jets were only installed for winter months, as pictures taken during summer months do not show these jets, and the pipe is capped off.

Current inspection of #14 and #16, shows that #14 has two pipes in front of the steam chests, connected to a single pipe running along side the boiler to the fireman's side of the cab. The tee and fingers at the end of the down leaders at the steam chests have been removed and a petcock on each side is installed. #16 has one pipe in front of the steam chest on engineers side, but that is capped off without a tee and fingers.

.

.

Couplers
BEDT used "eared" couplers on all their locomotives, both front and rear.

These couplers has "extensions" cast onto the top and bottoms of the normal knuckle part of the coupler. (The knuckle was cast in one piece at one time and were available as a special part, not as a recast).

The purpose of this was that in maneuvering up and down on the floatbridges, in where you would have a sharp horizontal angle change between the land and float bridge or float bridge and carfloat, the ears would provide more room for vertical movement of the car coupler (which was of normal style) in the locomotives coupler without becoming detached
.

.

.
Brakes

All BEDT steam locomotives used the "steam jam" brake method, and did not have air compressors mounted. In the case of the pre-owned H. K. Porters, which from all photographic accounts had air compressors mounted by their previous owners (Navy Fleet Supply Base, Mesta, etc. ), these air compressors were subsequently removed upon the locomotives arrival on the BEDT.

Steam jam brakes (steam piping to a cylinder and rigging which applied the brakes on the locomotive wheels only) was used for stopping the train. Once the freight cars were spotted in their respective location, the individual hand brakes on the freight cars were applied to prevent the car from moving. (See Memoirs for further information.)

.

.

Footboards

Early images of the steam locomotives, show that they were equipped with a full width footboard; which ran from engineers side, under the coupler and to the fireman's side.

However, later images of the locomotives, show the locomotives to be equipped with "split" footboards, meaning there was an open space under the coupler. The earliest images in my archives that showing split footboards on locomotives, is #11 in 1945, and #15 in 1946.

In some cases, locomotive photos on this website exhibit significant gaps in the timelines of photos shown, e.g.: I have no photos of #14 between circa 1941 and 1956 or #16 between 1923 and 1950; so it is difficult to pin down exactly when BEDT undertook the initiative to modify the footboards to the "split" design.

Based on the photos of #11 and #15, the best we can approximate this modification taking place is circa 1945.

full width footboard

split footboards    

.

.

Saddletank Repairs & Styles

As the saddletanks rotted out on some of the locomotives due to corrosion (after all, they were filled with water and exposed to salt air climate year round); BEDT would weld "skirts" on the bottom. More than skirts actually, BEDT actually "boxed" the bottoms of the saddletanks with steel plate and welded the seams together. Strangely, when the bottoms of the saddletanks were boxed, no front clean out plugs were reinstalled.

As far as can be told, only #15 and #16 received this square bottom modification. #15 apparently received this modification in an out of service period March 8 - May 31, 1962. #16 received this modification prior to that, sometime between June 1959 and September 1960.

#14 oddly received nothing more than expedient patches here and there as they were needed.


15 - original H. K. Porter round bottom saddletank


15 - BEDT modified square bottom saddletank

...


16 - original H. K. Porter round bottom saddletank


16 - BEDT modified square bottom saddletank 

The sidetanks on 12 and 13, we know from photographs in the Dave Plowden / Railroad Magazine article of April 1961; were simply removed from the locomotive prior to a repair.

The saddletank styles on #10 & 11 however were completely changed from their original design, which were round as delivered from Baldwin. After a rebuild around the mid 1930's, both 10 & 11 received square saddletanks with slightly rounded edges. The cab on #10 was rebuilt at this time as well and details are mentioned above in cab styles. #10 & 11 wore these square saddletanks to their demise.

.

.

#14 Temporary Pilot Replacement

In the John P. Gemeasky photo of 1936, #14 can be seen with an unusual wood pilot. This wood pilot is taller than the original cast steel (compare with space around shank & pocket which is different as well.)

Photos dated both before and after the 1936 Gemeasky photo, show the standard H. K. Porter cast steel pilot.

As best as can be discerned, apparently the original pilot suffered some damage and required removal. A temporary wood pilot with sheet steel end caps was installed. Poling pockets were bolted to this end cap by means of a bolt through the entire pilot beam.

The left image below shows the original H. K. Porter cast steel pilot, circa 1931. The right photo shows the temporary wood metal pilot in September 1936.

By a ca. 1941 photo, the pilot is back to original style, and it remained so throughout the rest of the locomotives service life and into display.

                original H. K. Porter cast steel pilot beam    

                temporary wood pilot beam with sheet steel end caps

.

.

#14 Lettering

Following the printing of several negatives, this author took note of a variant of lettering on the saddletank of BEDT locomotive #14.

From 1945 (the earliest image on this website of locomotive #14 with BEDT letter logo) until April 1956, the letters "B" "E" & "D" and "T" on the saddletank all had the triangle accent on the vertical leg of those letters.

From June / July 1957 through end on steam operations, the letters "E" and "D" do not have the triangle accent while the letters "B" and "T" did.

Please note: It is believed that the 1962 D. Keller photo is dated incorrectly, based on the fact this is the only "post 1957" photo showing the accents on the "E" & "D" on the fireman's side, and the Reading  Railroad gondola has a freshly painted 2/1957 service date stenciled on the side.

Also: the lack of accents on the "E" & "D" applies only to the fireman's side of the locomotive, as photos of the engineers side for all years, shows the letters having accents.

 1945 - April 1956

June 1957 - October 1963

However minor this observation may be, it assists us in dating photographs that have no date recorded.

#14 appears to have undergone a shop servicing, which include a complete repaint. It can only be hypothesized that the accents were inadvertently omitted while the lettering was painted.

.

.

#14 Firebox Explosion

This author has learned that BEDT #14 received a new boiler and firebox after an explosion in 1953, after having located this information in an old issue of Locomotive Notes; issue #94, October 1970, published by Roy Linscott, Jr. Prior to this revelation, I had found no references to this incident in any other subsequent historical publications or published sources relating to the BEDT and it's operations and locomotives.

Furthermore, I had previously come across several documents from the Elizabethport, NJ shops of the Central Railroad of New Jersey, regarding a new firebox being installed in 1954. This was located in papers sent to me courtesy of Kurt Bell of the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania some time ago. I had previously read about the new firebox being installed, but did not know of the explosion. I wrongly assumed it was merely extensive maintenance that had been contracted out by the BEDT and not the result of an "accident".

As the rebuild is dated soon after the explosion, I have concluded that the CRRNJ shops were contracted by BEDT to do the repairs. What has not been ascertained through the documents is whether this explosion is the result of a firebox overheat due to low water and subsequent crown sheet failure or some other combination of events.

.

According to Joe Roborecky, it has been alleged to him during his tenure, that at least one firebox explosion on a BEDT steamer was due to a low water condition with crown sheet failure. Joe unfortunately doesn't recall which locomotive this occurred on, so there could be a possibility that there was more than one firebox explosion.


Also, Tom Hendrickson located a newspaper article from the New York Time archives dated July 20, 1953 regarding this incident. Unfortunately, a locomotive number is not mentioned in this article. I have placed an image of the article with the CRRNJ Repair papers, which you can view through the link below.

Fortunately, Robert Brendel forwarded the following:


FORTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION
for year ending 6/30/1954:
July 19, 1953
Locomotive 14,
Brooklyn, N.Y..
Crown sheet failure caused by overheating due to low water; gage cock nipples extended into dripper, obstructing clear view of gage cock discharge; one killed, seven injured." 

BEDT 14 Firebox Explosion Documents

.

.

Locomotive Collision

   According to Tom Hendrickson, he recalls reading about a locomotive accident on the BEDT. He states in an email:

"Why was #11 scrapped in 1963? I vividly recall an accident that occurred around this time which I previously mentioned to you. It may have been in late 1962 or early 1963. It occurred during a workshift change about midnight. An article in the NY Daily News will have the title

"1 KILLED, 1 HURT IN RR ACCIDENT"

and will consist of about 4 paragraphs. I remember seeing and reading this article. I recall that my father told me that one of the steam locomotives was damaged so badly in this accident that it was decided to scrap it."

Tom and I have discussed this back and forth now for several emails, and as a result I have laboriously gone through my photo archives examining each locomotive picture and slide. I can determine that #11 was out of service from at least June 1959 (and possibly a few months earlier), as several dated slides and prints have turned up showing #11 sitting on the outdoor "garden track" along the south wall of the enginehouse from this date to February 1961. I have no images after this date, and pictures I thought of #11 being scrapped, were actually of #10. Considering the fact that Ron Ziel, Gerald Landau and a few other noted railfans were practically camped out at BEDT during this time, it strikes me as odd that there are no published or released photos known of this collision event.

So, there is a slim possibility that #10 might have been involved in this collision. One image taken by G. Votava in the Keller archives that is dated June 23, 1962, shows #10 sitting on the south enginehouse track in front of the water plug. So we know it was in service on this date, and there is no damage apparent in this rear left three quarter photo. In this same photo, there is a pile of scrap next to and behind the wood boxcar, which is most likely #11 being scrapped. 

We also know that #10 was scrapped in 1963 by different railfan / photographer accounts. The two photos that I have, which are dated 4/18/1963 and July 1963, and which I thought (erroneously) were of #11 getting scrapped; are actually of #10 being scrapped. Due to the advanced stages of the scrapping process in the two photos I own (saddletank, cab, back head are gone), it cannot be determined if there was any significant damage to the locomotive due to an accident.

There are one or two rays of hope in ascertaining more information about this incident:

  1. Is locating the ICC Accident Report (if one exists, and it should), in a trip to the National Archives I am anticipating.

  2. Is locating the Daily News article and narrowing down the date, and with any luck, the locomotive number.

   


return to
Main index
 


H. K. Porter Catalog - Specification Page

   Below is a scan of the appropriate page from the H. K. Porter catalog applicable to BEDT locomotives 12 through 16.
There is a lot of very interesting data that has not been previously published, such as:


 Authors note:
The weight shown is for a coal / wood burning locomotive.
As BEDT locomotives were oil fired; the oil preheaters, oil strainers, injectors, valves and related piping added an additional 2,000 pounds, to bring the total weight of locomotive to 128,000 pounds.

   


return to
Main index
 


A Visitor to Kent Avenue!

   For several years, I had been troubled over the identification and purpose of a centercab switcher of B-B wheel arrangement and siderods on BEDT property, which is barely visible in four pictures that I acquired from the A. Jaeger collection. These photos are dated February 19, 1961:

(photos enlarged and cropped to show loco in question)

..... ..... .....

   After having placed this dilemma on the back burner for a while; I once again took out my high power loupe and tried to identify this engine again. This time I enlisted the assistance of my good friend and Brooklyn terminal railroads cohort, Paul Strubeck. We argued over builders, but eventually discovered it was a Whitcomb locomotive. One of the pictures was at just the right angle to show the nose and the Whitcomb name on the front grill. Then inevitably, came more arguing: which model Whitcomb? With many thanks to North East Rails' Whitcomb pages and Jay Reed's "Critters' Dinkys and Centercabs", Paul and I determined this locomotive was either a 45DE27B or a 45DE28. After a little more debating, we settled on 45DE27B.

   Now for the next argument: who in the New York area would have had a Whitcomb loco? Was it an temporary Bush Terminal, New York Dock, or Bronx Terminal unit? A loaner or demonstrator? Or was it just passing through, being shipped from one place or another? (One thing was sure: it certainly was not a BEDT locomotive!) Then, after Paul Strubeck & I discussed it for about 15-20 minutes... It dawned on us... THE BROOKLYN NAVY YARD.

   A check of my Whitcomb builders records, showed several Whitcomb Brooklyn Navy Yard entries for both 45DE27B and 45DE28 units. These locomotives was part of multiple orders from the US Navy of Whitcomb 45DE27B units, with this unit going to Brooklyn Navy Yard, and the other units going to other Navy Yards around the US. The Whitcomb Builders Records sent to me by Allen Stanley show the locomotive going to the Brooklyn Navy Yard as:

builder: model: built: c/n: USN  #
(orig)
USN #
(renumber)
prime mover:
Whitcomb 45DE28 October 1941 60097

20

65-00165 (2) Cummins 150hp diesels
45DE28 October 1941 60098

21

65-00166
45DE28 October 1941 60099

22

65-00167
45DE28A.. September 1942.. 60165.. 65-00170
45DE27B August 1943 60325 65-00169
45DE27B June 1944 60326 65-00220 or
65-00252

   In late 2009, I commenced on rescanning my collection to place larger images on this website. When I got to the one of Alfred Jaeger photos of #16, I realized that the USN Whitcomb locomotive was in one of the photos, and even showed the side of the cab with lettering! This is the right most photo above.

   But, I know understand that the conclusion that Paul and I came to in regard to this locomotive being a 45DE27B could be wrong. Upon some scanning and enlarging on the cab seen in the last of the four photos above, yielded this result:

   The four images above are at different magnification and resolutions, with the last two being the same except for contrast and notation.

   Now, I can definitely make out the USN 65-00. It appears that the bottom half of the 1 is missing, but by the spacing to the next digit, (a 6); it is in fact a 1, making the number 65-0016. The last number is where the question lies: To me it appears to be a 5 or possibly a 6, making the number 65-00165 or 65-00166.

   Either of these numbers make this locomotive a 45DE28. If that last number by chance is a 9, then it is a 45DE27B. Now, see that light square above the number? That is the original two digit number painted over. Since only the original order of 45DE28's received the two digit numbers 20, 21, 22; and subsequent locomotives received the 65-00xxx series seven digit numbers, 65-00169 (the 45DE27B) would not have had the original two digit number "painted over".

   Therefore, I feel we are looking at either locomotive #20 / 65-00165 or #21 / 65-00166 which are 45DE28. You draw your own conclusion and decide.

   Now, most of us know; the BEDT carfloated to and for the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The questions that now remains unanswered is; was this BNY Whitcomb at the Kent Avenue enginehouse for: (my thoughts in parenthesis)

  • repair by the BEDT mechanical force;  (doubtful, BNY would have it's own mechanics)
  • shipment out of New York area after being sold or transferred to another government installation;  (possible)
  • shipment out of New York area after being sold to a private firm;  (highly possible as the Navy was selling off their older locomotives)
  • shipment out of New York area for scrapping,  (possible)
       or:
  • a test unit for BEDT for their upcoming dieselization?  (doubtful)

   If any of you out there know the answer to these questions, please... shoot me an email!

.

.

.

return to
Main index
 


Diesel Locomotive Overview

American Locomotive Company - Model S1

   The Alco S1 model was introduced in April of 1940, and a production total in excess of 3,200 units were manufactured by March 1961. Partial success of this model was due to the fact that War Productions Board restrictions enacted for World War II, delegated different locomotive builders to construct different application locomotives to avoid duplication of effort and likewise avoid waste of valuable and rationed raw materials. ALCo was therefore assigned to construct switching locomotives, and Electro-Motive Division was assigned road engines.

   It should be noted that ALCo models S1 through S4 are very similar in appearance to one another. While I could go into great lengths describing the differences between these models, I feel that is best left to the already published references on ALCo locomotives and diesel spotter guides. It should be taken into consideration and remembered for future reference; all of BEDT's diesel locomotives were S1 models, even though it can be found intermittently that some photographs, slides and auction descriptions erroneously list them as S2.

Speed
MPH

Tractive
Effort

Time
Limit

Grade - (compensated for curvature)

Level

0.5%

1.0%

1.5%

2.0%

2.5%

3.0%

5.0 34,000 90 min.

-

2240 1290 888 667 526 429
7.5 24,700 Cont. 5200 1590 908 617 457 355 285
10.0 18,900 90 min. 3870 1188 669 448 326 248 194
15.0 12,900 Cont. 2460 765 420 272 189 136 100
20.0 9,800 Cont. 1700 540 289 179 118 78 51
25.0 7,800 Cont. 1210 392 203 119 71 40

 -

30.0 6,350 Cont. 882 287 141 75

 -

 -

 -

35.0 5,100 Cont. 601 197 87

 -

 -

 -

 -

40.0 4,100 Cont. 415 125 44

 -

 -

 -

 -

Based on Davis train resistance formulae for standard 4-axle cars with an average weight per car of 40 tons.

   BEDT diesel operations began with the purchase of an American Locomotive Co. / General Electric model S-1: ex-Union RR #453 in 1962. The S1 model was a popular locomotive for switching, and in some cases short haul road assignments.

   The BEDT would purchase three more ALCo / GE S1's from Missouri Pacific (New Orleans Lower Coast). These first four diesel locomotives would completely supplant the steam locomotives at the BEDT on October 25, 1963.

   The BEDT would then go on to purchase two more S1's from Erie Lackawanna to give the BEDT a total of six ALCo / GE S-1's, with #26 being acquired as late as 1973 and being the final locomotive acquisition for the BEDT. These six ALCo S1's would be the only model diesel-electric locomotive that was owned by the BEDT.

A GP at BEDT?

   According to Jose Feliciano; he specifically recalls seeing a non-ALCo high hood locomotive working at BEDT very briefly sometime in 1977 or 1978.  Jose has; through his expertise, identified this anomaly as either a GP7 or GP9 and possibly a GP18 (all have same carbody). The entire locomotive was painted a dull flat yellow or beige primer. There were no discernible markings or livery. He recalls it was not being there long.

   As he used to live at #60 North 8th Street on the third floor of a walk up apartment building that had a fantastic overall view of the BEDT operations on the north end of the property out of his window, Jose would watch BEDT operations for hours on end. He is absolutely certain of his recollection as the locomotive was significantly larger than the S1 locomotives working near it, and as it was a different color.

   Unfortunately, Joe Roborecky (retired BEDT engineer, 1968-1983) does not recall any non-S1 locomotives being utilized by BEDT other than NYD 44 Tonners throughout his tenure. As we can understand, it is unlikely to confuse a GE 44 tonner with an EMD GP 7/9/18 due to the great difference in size and body style. However, there is always the slim possibility that Joe could have not been assigned to Kent Avenue operations or even on vacation during those few days when this unknown locomotive was tested.

   It goes without saying that Jose, Joe and myself (and I'm sure other BEDT fans as well) desire very much to know more about this situation. If any reader can provide any further information whatsoever, please do not hesitate to contact me at bedt14@aol.com. Your submissions will of course be credited to you.

   Returning to the BEDT S1's, and as all S-1's were of same general builders construction specifications, the following table (which is incomplete) applies to all BEDT S-1 locomotives:

locomotive builder: ALCo Schenectady Shops, NY
electrical components: General Electric
wheel arrangement: B-B
weight: 99 tons
length: 44' 6"
height: 14' 6"
width: 10' 2"
tractive effort (at 30% adhesion): 59,675 lbs
wheel diameter: 40"
prime mover: McIntosh & Seymour 6-539 - 4 stroke
# of cylinders: 6
firing order: 1-3-5-6-4-2
idle rpm / max rpm 240 / 740
horsepower: 660
airbrakes: 14ET *
generator: GT-552
traction motors: GE 731
gear ratio: 75:16
max. speed: 60 m.p.h.
trucks: ALCO "Blunt"
lubricant capacity: 80 gallons
coolant capacity: 220 gallons
fuel capacity: 635 gallons
fuel type: diesel fuel
number produced: 540

* = Footnote: BEDT discontinued use of the automatic (train) air brake controls in the cab, but the independent loco brakes were left intact and used for all braking. 

   


return to
Main index
 



B.E.D.T. Diesel Locomotive Roster
Click on number plates to view images of that locomotive.

B. E. D. T. #21

build #

build date

former owner(s)

acquired

notes & disposition

74351

8/1947

Union RR #453
Duffy (RR Equipment dealer)
Silcott (RR Equipment dealer)
BEDT / BEDT (NYD)

new
1962
1962

1962 - 8/12/1983

Stored operational on carfloat at Fulton Terminal.
Reactivated 3/1985 and became NYCH #21:

Retired unknown date.
Scrapped 7/2006

[Image]


B. E. D. T. #22

75525

10/1947

New Orleans & Lower Coast #9013
Missouri Pacific #6604
Duffy (RR Equipment dealer)
Silcott (RR Equipment dealer)
BEDT / BEDT (NYD)

new
1961
1962
1962?
11/1962
-8/17/1983

Became NYCH #22 - 8/1983
Used in regular operation.
Retired unknown date.
Scrapped 7/2006

[Image]


B. E. D. T. #23

75526

10/1947

New Orleans & Lower Coast #9014
Missouri Pacific #6605
Duffy (RR Equipment dealer)
Silcott (RR Equipment dealer)
BEDT / BEDT (NYD)

new
1961
1962
1962
11/1962 - 7/29/83

Stored operational November 1976.
Reactivated 4/1979.
Stored operational on carfloat 8/1983
.
Acquired by NYCH, stored unused
and scrapped 01/1986.

[Image]


B. E. D. T. #24

75527

10/1947

New Orleans & Lower Coast #9015
Missouri Pacific #6606
Duffy (RR Equipment dealer)
Silcott (RR Equipment dealer)
BEDT / BEDT (NYD)

new
1961
1962
1962
11/196
2 - 8/17/1983

Out of service May 1978.
Acquired 8/1983 by NYCH.
Stored & cannibalized for parts.
Scrapped 1986
.

[Image]


B. E. D. T. #25

74962

10/1946

Erie #307
Erie Lackawanna #307
BEDT / BEDT (NYD) [a]

new
1959
1968 - 8/17/83

Became NYCH #25 8/1983.
Retired ca. 2000 & stored.
Saved for preservation & painted to 
New York Central #8625 livery.
Currently on display in Riverside Park.

[Image]


B. E. D. T. #26

75354

8/1947

Erie #313
Erie Lackawanna #313
Neosho Construction #460
American Electric Power / Central Ohio Coal (Muskingum) #313
Silcott (RR Equipment dealer)
BEDT / BEDT (NYD)

new
1959
unknown
unknown
unknown
1973 - 8/??/83

Out of service prior to 8/12/1983
Stored on carfloat minus front & rear steps.
Acquired by NYCH for parts.
Scrapped 1986.

[Image]

    As of July 13, 2006, it saddens me to learn that BEDT #21 and #22 have fallen victim to the oxy-acetylene flame sometime earlier this week.
Only BEDT #25 has been saved from the scrappers torch, and has been "restored", albeit to New York Central markings (which it never was)
and is to be displayed in Riverside Park. I find it ironic, that the steam locomotives the diesels replaced, outlasted the diesels themselves.

[a] = see Equipment Footnotes, Bicentennial Celebration

.
.

   


return to
Main index
 



Diesel Locomotive Footnotes

.

Air Brakes "Train Line"

   Like the steam locomotives before them, BEDT would not use "train line" air brakes on the diesel locomotives for stopping the train. With the diesels, air powered locomotive brakes were the sole method of stopping.

   However, examination of photographs of the diesel locomotives revealed that after 1979, air brake hoses can be seen on locomotives #22 and #25.

   It is believed, that after the merger of New York Dock and Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal in 1978, that to use a BEDT locomotive at Bush Terminal (or Fulton or Atlantic Terminals if needed), air brakes were needed as New York Dock used the "train line" or "automatic" air brake set ups on their locomotives.

   Therefore it is believed, by the air lines as seen in the photographs, that #22 and #25 were re-equipped with air brakes to be compatible with operations at Bush Terminal. None of the other BEDT locomotives appear to have been refitted with train line air brakes, and #21 was refitted with automatic train line air brakes after being absorbed by the New York Cross Harbor RR.

 (See Memoirs for diesel locomotive brake methods.)

.

.

Footboards & End Plates

   Pursuant to enactment of FRA regulation 49 CFR Part 231.30 - Locomotives used in switching service.

   Subsection D: End footboards and pilot steps;

   (1) Except for steam locomotives equipped as provided in 231.16, locomotives used in switching service built after March 31, 1975, may not be equipped with end footboards or pilot steps.

   (2) Except for steam locomotives equipped as provided in 231.16, locomotives used in switching service built before April 1, 1975, may not be equipped with end footboards or pilot steps after September 30, 1978. Whenever end footboards or pilot steps are removed from a locomotive, the uncoupling mechanism and horizontal end handholds of the locomotive must be modified to comply with paragraphs (f) and (g) of this section.

   As such, the front and rear pilot footboards (where a brakeman could stand while the locomotive was switching cars) were removed from diesel locomotives operating in the United States. Likewise, all locomotives in use at the BEDT had their footboards removed to comply with this regulation.

   Also, according to FRA regulation 49 CFR 229.123; after January 1, 1981, each lead locomotive shall be equipped with an end plate that extends across both rails, a pilot, or a snowplow. The minimum clearance above the rail of the pilot, snowplow or end plate shall be 3 inches, and the maximum clearance 6 inches. However, it should be noted that BEDT locomotives show this endplate was installed before the enactment.

.

footboards mounted 
pre-1978

footboards removed
endplate installed
post -1978

.

.

Bell Mounting Locations.

   Bell mounting locations varied between two groups of BEDT diesel locomotives locomotives. Locomotive numbers 21, 22, 23 and 24 had their bells mounted under the frame in front of the battery box (engineers side).


   However, locomotive numbers 25 and 26 had their bells mounted on the top of the hood, in front of the cab by the fireman's upper middle window. This bell location was the standard location for bells on Erie / Erie Lackawanna ALCo locomotives, (which is where locomotives #25 and #26 originally came from).

.

.

Variants and Differences between BEDT diesel locomotives: Paint Schemes, etc

   While to the average viewer the BEDT diesel locomotives appear alike, there were actually many subtle differences in appearance and paint schemes between the six locomotives. There were four basic but distinctly different paint schemes for the locomotives that were owned by the BEDT. Making matters complicated, was the fact that there were variants to the schemes as well.


   Not all the locomotives however, wore each and every version of the paint schemes (i.e: only #21 wore the Dark Blue / Pale Yellow, #24 would not wear a white frame or hood stripe even though it would carry white letters and only #25 wore the Red Bicentennial Sash).


   Also to be taken into consideration, were the various changes that took place to the appearances of the locomotives to reflect FRA regulations and safety equipment.


   So, to better display these differences, I have created a webpage illustrating and outlining these variants between the diesel locomotives. While this chart may be of some interest to the casual observer, it will most likely prove to be indispensable to those trying to date an undated image and perhaps be even more of assistance to the "rivet counter" modeller who wants a particular model to be "spot on" accurate for a particular time frame! This variation list with illustrations can be viewed here:

Illustrated Guide to BEDT Diesel Locomotive Variants

.

   The lists on this page is by no means complete or finalized. Please feel free to submit your observations to me by email: bedt14@aol.com

   In regards to the diesel locomotives, all but one of the BEDT ALCo diesels have been scrapped. Numbers 23, 24 and 26 were purchased by the New York Cross Harbor Railroad for parts "donors" to keep 21, 22 and 25 running. Throughout the years, 23, 24 & 26 would meet their fate and would be scrapped, when no more viable parts were left.


   Numbers 21 and 22 would continue to serve in the employ of the New York Cross Harbor Railroad, which operated on the former Bush Terminal property. They would eventually be taken out of service and stored, with 25 remaining the sole "BEDT" locomotive in operation. Not too long after, number 25 would also be taken out of service, and replaced with newer model switchers.


   Eventually the end came for numbers 21 & 22, as after many years of storage, they were scrapped in the Greenville, NJ yards in July 2006, along with other obsolete (their view, not the authors!) New York Cross Harbor locomotives.


   A lucky BEDT historian (ahem...) was fortunate enough to find four (and only four, no others were seen) of #21's engine doors (and one sand filler cap from NYCH #11's ) in a pile of scrap metal in New Jersey, and rescued them:


July 2006 - Greenville, NJ
.

.

   One of the doors, still has traces of the letter "B" under a coat of blue paint. It is the announced intention of this historian to repaint and reletter each door "B" "E" "D" "T". When this occurs, it will be the last remaining link to BEDT diesels.

.

.

The Sole Surviving BEDT Diesel

    Number 25 however, would be "secretly" moved into the Cross Harbors' enginehouse, stripped, restored and repainted into a New York Central scheme. Luckily, the same historian who rescued #21's engine doors, went to visit the old Bush Terminal properties and enginehouse, when I (oops sorry... he) knocked and someone came to the door and invited him in. What should present itself, but none other than #25 stripped to bare metal! After asking for permission to photograph, which was granted, this author "went to town". The people restoring #25 were volunteers and that is how this author learned #25 was heading to Riverside Park, in NYC livery. Pictures of #25 stripped and in the NYCH enginehouse can be seen on #25 page.


   According to a New York Times article "A Chugger Floats to Stardom as a Park's Centerpiece"; it was purchased for scrap price by the developer for the park, then donated to the City of New York, who has the intent to display the locomotive in Riverside Park South, Manhattan. Being that Riverside Park South is ex-New York Central territory, it is apparent that someone thought of having a "New York Central" locomotive was fitting. Anyhow, this event took place in August 2006.


   And thus ends the story of the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal as an operation, but not as a memory. Its history lives on in the thousands of photographs that countless railfans took of the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal. Its history is also memorialized in it s steam locomotives, which have been preserved with the intent of keeping them "B. E. D. T." (That is, all but #15 who is now operating as Thomas the Tank Engine for Strasburg Railroad, in Pennsylvania) and all but one of the diesel locomotives are gone, and unfortunately; that sole survivor eludes her true heritage from Brooklyn.

.


"Roster On A Barge" - ca. September 1983
(combined locomotives of Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal and New York Dock)

unknown photographer
A. Miller collection

   


return to
Main index
 



Tugboat Overview

.

Tugboats

    All the carfloats and lighters mentioned below, were moved to and from the terminals throughout the years by a small fleet of tugboats. These tugboats varied in power in the later years, and ranged in horsepower from 350-1300, averaged 95' in length and about 190 gross tons. The early tugboats were of wood hull construction, but later tugboats would eventually be built with steel hulls.


   The Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal owned many tugboats during their existence and appear to have had at least two in service at any one time. In 1916, the Public Service Commission Report states the BEDT had 5 tugs. Having such a decent pool of tugboats throughout it's history, turned out to be to the advantage of the BEDT, as on September 30, 1920; the dredge "Raritan" (belonging to the United States) collided with the steam tug Integrity in New York Harbor. Damage to the Integrity was (in 1920 dollars) $26,114.57. with a lawsuit following the collision with the BEDT seeking demurrage.
[BEDT V. US #39, 287 U.S. 170; Oct, 21, Nov 14 1932). A copy of the pertinent parts of the lawsuit is listed in Memoirs below.


   The tugboats were steam powered at the turn of the century and fired by coal. Then newer steam powered tugboats fired by Bunker C fuel, were purchased about mid 1910's through the 1940's. Eventually diesel-electric power designs replaced those tugs in the late 1950's which precipitated the BEDT to switch from steam locomotives to diesel.


   While almost all of the tugboats prior to the 1970's were registered to the Brooklyn, NY port, and directly to the Havemeyer & Elder firm. However, the vessels "Petro Arrow" and "Petro Flame" had Philadelphia, PA ports of registry. At this time, it is unknown to whom these vessels were registered to in Philadelphia, but perhaps it is one of the petroleum or tobacco companies that became involved in the ownership of the BEDT during the 1970's.


    The tugboats names and specifications, along with photographs are listed in the "Tugboat Roster", and can be viewed through the link in the chapter below.

.

return to
Main index
 



Carfloat, Light & Scow Overview

.

Carfloats

  The Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal used many carfloats to receive and dispatch rail traffic. These carfloats are essentially flat barges with two or three tracks along the top. These barges would then be loaded with rail cars and floated across New York Harbor to BEDT. The early carfloats were wood hulled, and starting around 1905 they were constructed of steel plate. The carfloats ranged in length from 290 to 324 feet, with capacities from 12 to 22 cars.


   There were three basic types of carfloats used by the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal.

.

Three Track Interchange

   The most common type of carfloat seen in use by the BEDT was the three track interchange type. This design was used to carry freight cars to and from the various Rail Marine terminals located throughout New York Harbor.

   Freight cars would be put aboard at one terminal, the carfloat towed by tugboat to its destination terminal, and unloaded. Freight cars from that location would be put aboard in and the carfloat towed to another destination, and the process repeated.

.

Platform or Station

   Several of the carfloats once owned by BEDT, are the "Station" or "Platform" type. A "Platform" or "Station" type carfloat is a carfloat with two tracks instead of three. In place of the middle track, a platform equal in height to the floors on the boxcars (like a railway platform), ran down the center (lengthwise) of the carfloat.

   This raised platform eliminated the middle track on the carfloat, and while it lowered the car capacity of the carfloat, it enabled the carfloat to be moored to any pier and enabled companies to directly load or unload freight while the freight car still on the  carfloat. The illustration below shows the three basic types of carfloats utilized by the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal.

Centerpipe

   In the later years, BEDT reconfigured two carfloats as a "centerpipe" types. These "centerpipe" carfloats were converted from platform / station carfloat #26, and Pennsylvania RR #588 to transport and unload covered hoppers for H. & M. Schaefer Brewery, when the Lehigh Valley ceased service to that firm in 1975.


   This centerpipe carfloat was similar in track layout design to a platform float, with two tracks on either side of a deckpipe mounted waist high with capped hose couplings every 10 feet or so, down the long axis of the float. This arrangement allowed short hoses to coupled from the bottom of the hoppers to the deckpipe, and then a hose from the end of the carfloat to the Brewery. By this method, brew ingredients (yeast, barley, hops) in the covered hoppers could be siphoned or drawn off the cars by air pressure and vacuum (pneumatics), while the hoppers were still on the carfloat and thereby eliminating the need to unload those freight cars at Schaefer Brewery
.  


   Now, following some research Paul Strubeck commenced on 17 November 2011, and in part to his ever growing knowledge on marine vessel appurtenances learned from his working on the "Cornell" (a former Lehigh Valley RR tugboat and now privately owned), the following information has been discerned.  


   Therefore, Paul and I have come to the conclusion that BEDT centerpipe carfloat #32 is NOT the Lehigh Valley centerpipe carfloat (as previously stated here) and seen on page 60 (Jay Held photo) of New York Harbor Railroads, Volume 2 by Thomas Flagg; but in fact BEDT #32 was converted to a centerpipe carfloat from a Pennsylvania RR platform / station carfloat.  


   The reasoning behind this change of opinion is that Paul noticed that BEDT #32 has Pennsylvania RR style "button" bitts and box style track bumpers. The Lehigh Valley centerpipe did not have button style bitts, and neither did BEDT 26. I had concluded BEDT might have simply added or changed the bitts and bumpers to their preferred style. But Paul also pointed out the BEDT #32 was a long style carfloat with a segment of deckpipe to the rear of the platform. The Lehigh Valley carfloat did not have this and their platform was located at the extreme end of their deck pipe, whereas both BEDT 26 & 32 the platform is offset from the rear end of the deckpipe. So, all those things considered, it is apparent we are now looking at a third centerpipe carfloat.  


   Furthermore, another piece of information leading to this opinion stems from when BEDT 26 was converted from platform / station to centerpipe, BEDT took the platform off the carfloat (cutting the platform legs where they were welded to at the deck of the carfloat) and made a loading dock out of it for parallel to track 9A5 located between North 9th and North 10th Streets. This "instant" loading dock can be seen quite clearly in the Robert Hart Sr. photo on page 24 of September 1992 issue of Railpace. That platform has a distinctly curved roof which matches the platform roof on BEDT carfloat #26 before it was converted (refer to images of BEDT carfloat #26 prior to conversion on the Marine Equipment page).  


   Now coincidentally, I also have two images taken by Tim Darnell dated October 1975 of BEDT locomotive #21 (see BEDT #21 image page) next to a platform which is clearly taken off a platform / station carfloat and marked with the number 588 in white block style numerals on a red beam. This number, font and color combination by the way, very conveniently conforms to Pennsylvania RR marine equipment numbering system and livery colors. Furthermore, this platform roof clearly is a silver colored corrugated sheet made of tin or galvanized steel. And by referencing page 100 of New York Harbor Railroads in Color Volume 2, by Thomas Flagg, almost all of the station carfloats seen are of the same color combination and roof style & color! For the record, it is not seen in any earlier dated images.


   Now if one keeps in mind the date this all taking place, (via Schaefer Brewery's own History webpage), Schaefer Brewery announced closing the Brooklyn plant in 1975:

"By 1975, it was obvious that one of less efficient plants would be closed. In 1976 Schaefer announced the closing of the Brooklyn plant. This announcement, only one week after Rheingold disclosed its plans to also shut down in Brooklyn, left Brooklyn and New York City without a single producing brewery."  
.
.

   By previous historical accounts, Lehigh Valley RR announced it would be dropping Schaefer as a customer almost immediately after Schaefers announcement. This left Schafer without a shipper, and BEDT stepped in to fill that void. This would mean BEDT would have needed at least one (but more likely two) centerpipe carfloats in servicing Schaefer; i.e.: one carfloat would be loaded with full hoppers and moored to the bulkhead at Schaefer (thereby taking it out of service temporarily) as Schaefer would draw off the contents, and another carfloat would would be able to have the recently unloaded hoppers removed and consequently be loaded with full hoppers at BEDT. Then BEDT would just swap out the carfloats at Schaefer Brewery and the process repeated.  


   Now, we've always assumed BEDT took possession of Lehigh Valley RR's centerpipe carfloat, but upon further reflection, Paul's observations and if previous historical accounts are factual (and we have no reason to think otherwise) that Lehigh Valley dropped Schaefer Brewery as a customer when Schaefer announced they were leaving New York. Obviously for their own reasons, Lehigh Valley RR did this with very little notice (and in my opinion quite unprofessionally). Therefore, if Lehigh Valley was being crass, why would they (Lehigh Valley) do an "about face" and act all benevolent by selling to BEDT their (Lehigh Valley's) centerpipe to continue service to Schaefer. Why help competition? Why not Lehigh Valley just keep servicing Schaefer Brewery themselves?  


   So if in fact Lehigh Valley took this route, BEDT would probably need two centerpipe carfloats (as explained above). One we know was converted from BEDT #26, and BEDT #32 now appears to have been converted early to mid 1975 from Pennsylvania Railroad platform / station carfloat #588. The reason why I believe this to be is, BEDT already developed the expertise and knowledge in taking station/platform carfloat once before (#26) and converted it to a centerpipe. Therefore, they already had the "experience" and knowledge to do it again. Only this time they purchased Pennsylvania Railroads platform / station carfloat #588 to do the job. It is presumed that PRR had quite a bit of surplus marine equipment with what the declining carfloat business in the New York Harbor area during this decade and/or the impending formation of Conrail. So, BEDT did what they already knew how to do: remove the platform off a platform / station carfloat and convert to a centerpipe, thereby giving them a second centerpipe carfloat.  


   And, just as naturally, with all railroads suffering in the fiscally crunched 1970's), they did not throw anything away, and so BEDT used the platform as a loading dock up at Pidgeon Street where we see it in the photos of BEDT #21 commencing October 1975.


   Yes, it is a lot of circumstantial evidence, (but we are not trying to convict someone in a criminal court), just find out when and where BEDT acquired their centerpipe carfloats! In conclusion, I feel both Paul and have followed a very logical line of thinking with the aforementioned conclusions. What this hypothesis does do, though is raise the following questions:

  1. Did Lehigh Valley have a second centerpipe carfloat for swapping out at Schaefer?

  2. What became of Lehigh Valley's centerpipe carfloat(s),
    but most importantly,

  3. the reason for dropping Schafer Brewery on such short notice.

.




   Essentially, the "centerpipe" carfloats was a floating wharf, and eliminated the need for building a float bridge and team tracks on land at the Schaefer facility, and was a cost effective method of delivery.


   In all actuality, the BEDT centerpipe carfloats were not in use long, seeing how BEDT picked up Schaefer as a customer in 1975 and Schafer closed its Brooklyn plant towards the end of 1976 or early 1977. It leaves one to wonder even why BEDT would go through the expense of converting those carfloats for such a short duration, knowing Schaefer was closing the plant and leaving the New York area. Unless of course BEDT was hedging a bet on a last minute reprieve of Schaefers decision to close the plant, and it would stay open. But, as we all know now, Schaefer closed the plant.

.

The Odd Ball Carfloat

   Coming to light in March 2012, is a unique carfloat operated by the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal.


   This carfloat was numbered 31, and is a station / platform carfloat of usual design. However, as brought to my attention by Benjamin Schaefer, there was a platform above the roof of the regular platform. Without actually seeing it, Ben described the arrangement an elevated platform above the standard platform roof, with steel staircase up to the raised platform. Attached to this platform was an "L" shaped pipe with a small pulley on the end like the davits for lifeboats on ships. This davit swiveled as well. Ben seems to recall this was originally a New York Central carfloat before the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal acquired it.


   Ben's original thought was the raised platform was used to assist the floatman navigating the float and relaying the information by hand signal to the captain of the tugboat. But Ben noticed this raised platform was at the stern of the carfloat. My original thought was that the carfloat was used in transport of insulated non-mechanical refrigerator cars (known as "reefers" in railroading). The platform would assist workers in the placing of blocks of ice in those reefer to keep their loads chilled. As Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal serviced quite a few meat packers on North 5th Street, this seemed like a logical conclusion. The davit hoist logically would be used to lift the blocks of ice.


   Ben informed me that he had images of the carfloat and would get them to me at the upcoming 2012 Clark, NJ Railroadiana Show. In the meantime, Ben found an image of this carfloat in Tom Flagg's book "New York Harbor Railroads in Color, Volume 2", p113. The image taken by Tom, was taken from the Williamsburg Bridge and the carfloat is really in the distance. But we were able to discern that carfloat has covered hoppers loaded on one of the tracks.


    When I took possession of Ben's images, and actually seeing the carfloat up close in Ben's images, it became obvious this was not an "icing" platform. There is a safety railing around the entire circumference of platform (with the exception of access to the stairs) and the raised platform is raised several feet higher than the roof of the platform. This would preclude workers of exiting the raised platform with the block of ice, without having to first climb over the safety rail and jump down to the roof of the platform.


   Then Joe Roborecky, Paul Strubeck and I took note of small diameter pipe (1 1/2 to 2 inches in diameter). This pipe is mounted to the outside edge of the carfloat and upon passing the roofline of a freight car, turned inwards 90 degrees (from vertical to horizontal) towards the raised platform, where it was secure to the safety rail. A handled valve can be seen on the pipe, and the pipe continued under the top safety rail to the other end of the raised platform, where it now turned 90 degree again from perpendicular to the carfloat to parallel with the carfloat. Here the pipe simply ends. Had it not been for that valve, we would have simply written the pipe off as electrical conduit. But obvious it was meant to carry something. Being of such small diameter, the flow capacity of the pipe could not be great.


   In considering the fact we see the carfloat with covered hoppers, we raised and subsequently disproved the carfloats use as an auxiliary flour carrier. Then I postulated that the carfloat might have been have been used to receive the used diatomaceous earth used for filtering in the sugar process, but in reviewing photos of Domino refinery, failed to reveal anything.


   Then Paul raised the possibility that this carfloat might have been an attempt at a primitive centerpipe carfloat, with the centerpipe mounted under the main platform. Hoses then could be connected  to the round openings seen along and under the main platform deck. However, other images of New York Central platform carfloat show similar openings, so I do not think they were hose connections, but possibly just tubes used for running hoses from one track under the platform to the other track. But taking upon his original thought, I came up with the following:


   When Lehigh Valley decided to cease service to Schaefer Brewery, they may or may not have lent their centerpipe carfloat to Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal for use until Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal could actually make a centerpipe of their own. Joe Roborecky feels Lehigh Valley did lend Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal the Lehigh Valley centerpipe, I however do not and my reasoning for this as I've stated before is, if Lehigh Valley dropped Schaefer before Schaefer closed Brooklyn plant in the first place and for whatever reason (Lehigh Valley being cash strapped? Schaefer owed them money?) they were not being nice to Schaefer Brewery (putting it nicely!),  


   Now since Lehigh Valley dropped Schaefer Brewery, why would Lehigh Valley make it easy for Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal and lend them their (Lehigh Valley) centerpipe for Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal to continue service to Schaefer? Furthermore, we have never seen the Lehigh Valley centerpipe in tow by Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal tugs or moored at Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal. (Yet...)


   This being the case, Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal was hard pressed to institute "direct from carfloat" service for Schaefer Brewery, and get it going fast. So Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal shop mechanics "threw" this raised platform on one of their existing platform carfloats (which happened to be #31). This platform would reach the connections for the curved side by side siphon pipe mounted on the hinged 'A' Frame and overhanging the bulkhead at Schaefer.


   The davit seen on #31's raised platform could conceivably be used to hoist a ridge wall pipe / hose to the overhanging pipe connection. The 1½" - 2" airline could have been used to pressurize the hoppers for offloading hence the shut off valve, but then we don't see a similar pipe on #26 / #32, I don't know, but perhaps it was in the form of a hose on those carfloats and coiled up in the bow boxes on #26 & #32.


   In the mean time, after Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal threw together #31 and at least started direct from carfloat service up and running for Schaefer, the more proper centerpipe carfloats (based on Lehigh Valley's design) were built from BEDT #26 and Pennsylvania RR #588, (which would become BEDT #32). And I feel #26 / #32 were constructed during or shortly after #31 was modified. I can't image it taking too long to modify #31, simply putting a platform on legs, but no doubt #26 and #32 were a little more elaborate and probably took longer to construct.


   When #26 / #32 were ready, #31 was just "moored and stored" at Kent Avenue with the other extra marine equipment. By the dates of Ben's images, Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal was closed and #31 appears to be in the process of being scrapped.


   In conclusion, we still really do not know the carfloats true purpose, and whether we will we ever find out, is anyone's guess. But I do not feel that #31 was used for flour or icing; but I still don't rule out its being used for holding covered hoppers for the purpose of receiving used diatomaceous earth / sludge from Domino or Revere.


Carfloat #31 - August 15, 1983 - North 9th Street bulkhead, Brooklyn, NY
With ex-B&O platform carfloat #197.
(in process of being scrapped)
 Benjamin W. Schaefer photo

added 05 March 2012

.

.

Lighters

   Going back further in time, the Department of Commerce publication "Ports of the United States", 1916; states that the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal also owned 12 lighters in addition to 13 car floats. No other known documentation about these lighters exists, but the Public Service Commission Report, also of 1916; lists the equipment at 19 barges, canal boats and carfloats.


   To date, I have not come across any images of lighters.

.

Scows

   Ben Schaefer also passed along the following information: that upon the demise of Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, several pieces of floating equipment were acquired by New York Dock, and by nature of the 1977 merger with same, were stored at Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal.  


   Along with numerous platform / station carfloats, the floating machine shop "James H. Clark" and the tugboat 'Roy B. White"; two scows numbered 345 and 350 were also acquired from Baltimore & Ohio. These scows were used by the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal in the transport of copper to the Phelps - Dodge Refining Corporation located on Newtown Creek. The copper was used for for the making of copper sulfate based pesticides, and smelting.


Scow #345 (ex-B&O) - October 1982 - North 9th Street, Brooklyn, NY
With BEDT centerpipe #32 behind.
The three yellow box bumpers on the right edge of the photo are from yet another three track interchange carfloat on the far side
of the centerpipe carfloat.
 unknown photographer
authors collection

added 06 March 2012

.

   For unknown reasons there was a long involved process for the transfer of copper ingots arriving via the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal to Phelps - Dodge:


   High cube boxcars loaded up to their haulage capacity with 750 pound copper ingots, arrived at Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal one three track interchange carfloats. These boxcars were hauled off the three track interchange carfloats, and transferred onto a modified station / platform carfloat. Joe Roborecky recalls that this station carfloat was so modified, in that the roof was raised to accommodate the opening of the plug doors on high cube boxcars.


   One empty boxcar with a fork lift inside was also loaded onto the station carfloat, with the boxcars loaded with copper. This carfloat was then moved slightly upriver from the float bridge at North 9th Street to north side of "9 Pier" (slightly north of the float bridge) and moored to the pier. Then, one of the former B & O scows would be moored against the station carfloat. Then the fork lift would take the copper ingots out of the boxcars and set them down on the carfloat platform where another (or the same) fork lift would stack the ingots on the scow!


   When all the boxcars were unloaded and the ingots on the scow, the scow was brought to Phelps - Dodge. Fortunately, this operation did not occur every day, and I certainly hope not considering the labor involved!


   And exactly why this procedure was needed is unclear. I can only hazard a guess that perhaps there was bulk head crane at Phelps Dodge to remove the stacks of ingots from the deck of the scow in bulk, and the with the ingots loaded inside boxcars, they couldn't be accessed.

   


return to
Main index
 


 ..
Palmer's Dock & Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal
Tugboat Roster

(Click on the tugstack below to see tugboat pictures)

date built
(BEDT service 
dates)

builder /
location

official
number/
hull number


length

beam

draft


hp

gross tonnage

net tonnage

former owner
"vessel name"


power


notes

"Charles H. Senff"

1882 Brooklyn,
NY
120003
26003
91.4' 22' 11' 357 147 100 coal / steam overhauled 10/26/1906
hull: wood; to the "Mary T. Tracy" of Tracy Towing Line, Philadelphia, PA

"Lowell M. Palmer"
"Intrepid"
(1st)

1887 Beafy & Levy
Philadelphia,
PA
140893 91' 22.5' 10' 350 119 59 coal / steam
hull: wood;   engine: compound;   cyl: 20" & 24";   stroke: 26";   boiler: leg type, 9' dia x 14.6', 145 h.p.;   working pressure: 125 p.s.i.

"Henry U. Palmer"
"Integrity"
(1st)

1891 Philadelphia,
PA
96130 90.8' 22' 10.2' 350 137 68 coal / steam

"Industry" (1st)

1906 Staten Island Shipbuilding,
Port Richmond, NY
390 / 203782 87' 24' 12' 637 163 111 steam  
hull: steel;   engine: compound;   cyl: 18" x 38";   stroke: 26";   boiler: single ended scotch, 13.6' dia x 10.6', 145 h.p.;   working pressure: 150 p.s.i.

sold; renamed "Carrie T. Meseck", "Delaware", "Manie L. Piner", "Bull", "Sea Star". Dieselized unknown date.


"Invincible"

1913 - 1956 > Skinner Shipbuilding,
Baltimore,
MD
211825 95.1' 26.3' 12.1' 850 231 135 steam
hull: steel;   engine: compound;   cyl: 19" x 40";   stroke: 28";   boiler: single ended scotch, 15.3' dia x 12.6', 180 h.p.;   working pressure: 165 p.s.i.

"Industry" (2nd)
"Invader"

1918 - 1960 > Green Bay,
WI
217301 95.5' 24' 13' 500 192 100

US Shipping Board
"Chocheco"

bunker oil / steam 500 ihp 2cyl compound
sank 1930, raised
sank East River 1947; raised

"Integrity" (2nd)

1918 - 1962 > Green Bay,
WI
217302 95.5' 24' 13' 500 192 100

US Shipping Board
"Cockamong"

bunker oil / steam 500 ihp 2cyl compound

"Integrity" (3rd)

1930

(1964 - 1970)
Pusey & Jones
Wilmington, DE
230267 195

Erie
"Cleveland"

I-R diesel / electric

"Intrepid" (2nd)

1930

(1962 - ?)
Pusey & Jones
Wilmington, DE
230416 195

Erie
"Scranton"

I-R diesel / electric

"Olean"

1930

Erie

I-R diesel / electric

did not enter BEDT service -
cannabalized for parts


      "Petro Arrow" [1972-1977 (78?) ]
   "Williamsburgh" [1978-1979]
       "Brooklyn III" [1979-1983]

this vessel not to be confused with the N.Y. Dock "Brooklyn III";
(see author's note below)

1953

(1972
-1983)
Jakobson Shipyard
Oyster Bay, LI, NY
266145
/ 344

106' 26' 12' 1590

NYNH&H: "Cordelia"

NYNH&H:
"Transfer #23"

Penn Central:
"Transfer #23"

Cleveland
diesel / electric
(sold / scrapped 1996)
Petro Arrow port of registry: Philadelphia, PA. Unknown at this time why this is, or to whom registered.
Please refer to  Equipment Footnotes for bicentennial paint scheme.


 "Petro Flame"

[1972 - ? ]

         "Greenpoint"

[ ? - ca. 1978]

  "New Jersey"

[1979 - 1983]
1953

(1972
-1983)
Jakobson Shipyard
Oyster Bay, LI, NY
265688
/ 345
106' 26' 12' 1590

NYNH&H:
"Bumblebee"

NYNH&H:
"Transfer #24"

Penn Central:
"Transfer #24"

Cleveland
diesel / electric
(became Cross Harbor I)
sold: Eastern Towboat
for sale: 2005
sold: 2007 to Rhode Island Yacht Club as moored breakwater, sunk 
Petro Flame port of registry: Philadelphia, PA. Unknown at this time why this is, or to whom registered.
Please refer to  Equipment Footnotes for bicentennial paint scheme.



   There is a lot of confusion regarding the NYD & BEDT tugboats named "Brooklyn III".

   The Thomas Flagg and Jay Bendersky books use a numbering method: "Brooklyn III (1) and Brooklyn III (2),
but this could lead one to believe that the New York Dock had two separate tugs named Brooklyn III throughout their history; and the BEDT had two separate tugs named Brooklyn III throughout their history; for a total of four vessels; and this is not the case. Therefore, in my opinion; by calling them the Brooklyn III (1) and Brooklyn III (2) confuses matters.



   As BEDT and NYD theoretically remained separate entities with separate logos, I feel it is simpler to regard and refer to each vessel as to the owner, i.e.: the "NYD Brooklyn III" and the "BEDT Brooklyn III". At no time did these two vessels operate in New York Harbor bearing the same name at the same time.

Simply put and in chronologic order (oldest name first):

the NYD "Brooklyn III" was the:

...||...

the BEDT "Brooklyn III" was the:

ex-Erie "Marion" ...||... ex-New York, New Haven & Hartford "Cordelia"
ex-Crescent Towing "Marion Smith" ...||... ex-New York, New Haven & Hartford "Transfer No. 23"
acquired by NYD and named "Brooklyn III" 1978 ...||... acquired by BEDT and named "Petro Arrow" 1972
renamed by NYD to "New York" 1979 ...||... renamed by BEDT to "Williamsburgh" 1978
...||... renamed by BEDT to "Brooklyn III"   May 1979

.

...||...

did not have canopy on deck aft of wheelhouse,
did not have any logo/herald on stack

...||...
...||...
had canopy on deck aft of wheelhouse,
had BEDT Marine (tapered red & white flag) herald on sta
ck


   
Please do not misunderstand me, I am quite appreciative of all the research work previous historians have accomplished. It took me several readings to get the history straight.
I felt it would be simpler to list as I have done above, and others agree.



I am always seeking detailed technical specifications and build info for all BEDT Tugs not already listed -
If you have or know where it can be obtained, please contact me at
BEDT14@aol.com

click here:

   


return to
Main index
 



Palmer's Dock & Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal
Carfloat & Scow Roster

number configuration official and/or construction # shipyard hull laid launched delivered info notes ref.
#1 ca. 1900-1917 wood hull, 230'

#2 162867 Noank, CT 1906 wood hull, 276-278'
gr. tonnage: 853
[1]

#3 ca. 1891-1897 wood hull, 221-225'

#4 ca. 1891-1897 wood hull, 221-225'

#5 164065 / 101 NY Shipbuilding
Camden, NJ
2 Mar 1910 20 Apr 1910 25 Apr 1910 steel hull, 256-258'
gr. tonnage: 792
[1]
[5]

#6 platform 165480 NY Shipbuilding
Camden, NJ
17 July
1913
13 Sep
1913
19 Sep 1913 steel hull, 256-258'
gr. tonnage: 825
[1]
[5]

#7 165041 / 133 NY Shipbuilding
Camden, NJ
3 Jul 1912 30 Sep 1912 5 Oct 1912 steel hull, 256-258'
gr. tonnage: 873
[1]
[5]

#8 ca. 1891-1897 wood hull, 221-225'

#9 162858 Noank, CT 1906 wood hull, 276-278'
gr. tonnage: 853
[1]

#10 ca. 1891-1897 wood hull, 221-225'

#11 ca. 1900-1917 wood hull, 230'

#12 ca. 1900-1917 wood hull, 230'

#13 146 NY Shipbuilding
Camden, NJ
29 July 1913 04 Sep 
1913
28 Sep 
1913
steel hull [5]

#14 three track interchange 164873 / 128 NY Shipbuilding
Camden, NJ
1 Feb 1912 26 Mar 1912 3 Apr 1912 steel hull
gr. tonnage: 807
[1]
[5]

#15 166793 Brooklyn, NY 1890 wood hull, 253'
gr. tonnage: 484
[1]

#16 166978 Brooklyn, NY 1890 wood hull, 253'
gr. tonnage: 425'
[1]

#17 268 NY Shipbuilding
Camden, NJ
6 Apr 1922 24 May 1922 27 May 1922 steel hull

#18 three track interchange 269 NY Shipbuilding
Camden, NJ
4 May 1922 31 Jul 1922 3 Aug 1922 steel hull in service 
as of 11/1964
[2]

#19 275 NY Shipbuilding
Camden, NJ
19 Oct 1922 14 Dec 1922 19 Dec 1922 steel hull in service 
as of 11/1964
[2]

#20 three track interchange 276 NY Shipbuilding
Camden, NJ
21 Nov 1922 4 Jan 1923 4 Jan 1923 steel hull in service 
as of 11/1964
[2]

#21 three track
interchange
277 NY Shipbuilding
Camden, NJ
20 Dec 1922 1 Feb 1923 12 Feb 1923 steel hull in service 
as of 11/1964
[2]

#22 three track interchange 370 NY Shipbuilding
Camden, NJ
17 Mar 1927 16 May 1927 21 May 1927 steel hull in service 
as of 11/1964
[2]

#23 three track interchange 1948 17 cars
steel hull
in service 
as of 11/1964
[2]

#24 three track interchange 1948 17 cars
steel hull
in service 
as of 11/1964
[2]

#25 platform 1948 12 cars
steel hull "bicentennial carfloat"
in service 
as of 11/1964

leased to New York Cross Harbor
8/1983; returned to NYD Properties
[2]
[4]

#26 platform /
center pipe
1940 12 cars
steel hull
Schaefer Brewery 
carfloat
in service 
as of 11/1964
[2]
[3]
This platform carfloat was converted post 1972 to a center pipe configuration for use at the Schaefer Brewery.
(reference photo in marine paragraph on Bush Terminal webpage)

The platform from this carfloat was placed at North 9th Street and used as a truck to boxcar loading platform.

#27 three track interchange 1940 12 cars middle track removed [6]

#28 three track interchange 1953 22 cars leased to New York Cross Harbor
8/1983; returned to NYD Properties
[6]

#29 three track interchange 1953 22 cars sold to New York Cross Harbor
8/1983
[6]

#30 three track interchange 1954 22 cars sold to New York Cross Harbor
9/1983
[6]

#31 special platform 1940 14 cars [6]
This carfloat had an elevated platform or "flying bridge" above the normal carfloat platform roof. Also steep steel steps from the carfloat deck led up to the flying bridge.
Accessed by this flying bridge was a small swivelling davit with pulley, for possibly lifting a hose or hoses.
It is believed this flying bridge was hastily constructed on this carfloat to initally start direct from carfloat service for the Schaefer Brewery, with the flying bridge used to make
the connection to the double siphon pipe overhanging the Schaefer Brewery bulkhead, until the centerpipes #26 & 32 were completed, but this is unconfirmed.

#32 center pipe 1940 steel hull
10 cars
Schaefer Brewery 
carfloat
ex-PRR #588
seen in images dated 1976 Greenville, and 1982 at BEDT Bulkhead
This carfloat is seen in Greenville, NJ next to the Petro Arrow in 1976, and tied up at Kent Avenue afterwards. This carfloat has boxed track bumpers, and not Hayes style
as seen on BEDT centerpipe carfloat #26. Nor do the track bumpers of this carfloat match those on the Lehigh Valley centerpipe carfloat either.
Therefore it is know believed that #32 is a third centerpipe carfloat used for Schaefer Brewery service.
Furthermore, this carfloat has "button" style bitts which were standard appliances on almost all Pennsylvania RR marine equipment.

Coincidentally, seeing how a surplus carfloat platform bearing the number 588 is seen in images dated after 1975 at Pidgeon Street, it is believed that BEDT centerpipe carfloat #32
was converted from PRR station carfloat #588, and the platform used like that of Carfloat #26: as a truck to boxcar loading platform.

#64 three track interchange [6]

#70 three track interchange 1930 17 car capacity ex-Penn Central
exx-New York, New Haven & Hartford
[6]

#72 three track interchange 1957 17 car capacity ex-Penn Central
exx-New York, New Haven & Hartford
[6]

#80 three track interchange 1953 22 car capacity possibly purchased  directly by BEDT,
sister to BEDT #28, 29, 30
[6]

#84 three track interchange 1954 22 car capacity ex-Penn Central
exx-New York, New Haven & Hartford
[6]

#189 platform 1930 12 car capacity ex-Baltimore & Ohio
acquired by New York Dock 9/20/1976

o.o.s. 9/29/1977
[6]

#197 platform 1951 12 car capacity ex-Baltimore & Ohio
acquired by New York Dock 9/20/1976
[6]

#207 platform 1955 12 car capacity ex-Baltimore & Ohio
acquired by New York Dock 9/20/1976
[6]

#209 platform 1956 12 car capacity ex-Baltimore & Ohio
acquired by New York Dock 9/20/1976
[6]

#210 platform 1957 10 car capacity ex-Baltimore & Ohio
acquired by New York Dock 9/20/1976

o.o.s. 9/29/1977
[6]

#211 platform 1956 12 car capacity ex-Baltimore & Ohio
acquired by New York Dock 9/20/1976o.o.s. 9/29/1977
[6]

#212 platform 1956 12 car capacity ex-Baltimore & Ohio
acquired by New York Dock 9/20/1976
[6]

#214 platform 1957 10 car capacity ex-Baltimore & Ohio
acquired by New York Dock 9/20/1976
[6]

#215 platform 1957 12car capacity ex-Baltimore & Ohio
acquired by New York Dock 9/20/1976

o.o.s. 9/29/1977
[6]

#216 platform 1957 12 car capacity ex-Baltimore & Ohio
acquired by New York Dock 9/20/1976
[6]
Platform roof raised to clear hi cube boxcar plug doors 8/8/1978. Work was performed by BEDT shop employees at north side of North 9th Street Pier.

#218 platform 1957 12 car capacity ex-Baltimore & Ohio
acquired by New York Dock 9/20/1976

o.o.s. 9/29/1977
[6]

LV #? center pipe Schaefer Brewery 
carfloat
[6]
This carfloat can be seen in the photo taken by Jay Held and on page 60 of "New York Harbor Railroads in Color, Vol. 2" by Tom Flagg. It appears to have wood rub rails.
The disposition of this carfloat is not known, but if this LV carfloat was at the end of it's service life, it is possible however unlikely, BEDT removed it's centerpipe and platform
and transferred this equipment to the PRR #588 carfloat(becoming BEDT #32), but this unconfirmed.
Furthermore, this carfloat may not have ever been transferred or sold to BEDT.

#232 scow ex-Pennsylvania RR
acquistion details unknown
(seen in 10/10/1977 pic with BEDT #25)
[6]

#345 scow 400 ton capacity acquired from Baltimore & Ohio RR
used for transport of copper for Phelps-Dodge, Newtown Creek, Queens, NY
[6]

#350 scow 400 ton capacity acquired from Baltimore & Ohio RR
used for transport of copper for Phelps-Dodge, Newtown Creek, Queens, NY
[6]
number configuration official and/or construction # shipyard hull laid launched delivered info notes ref.

Carfloat Footnotes

[1] = ascertained from Merchant Sailing Vessels of the United States, 1920
[2] = as listed on Daily Report of Towing, for Intrepid, November 28, 1964
[3] = converted from a two track station carfloat
[4] = please refer to Equipment Footnotes, Bicentennial Celebration
[5] = ascertained  from New York Shipbuilding Historical Site 
[6] = information comes from Benjamin W. Schaeffer, which in turn was received during a telephone call with Mark S. Balkin, in 1978. Information had been compiled by Mr. Balkin for an intended article on New York Dock Railway but upon Mr. Balkin's death, went unpublished. This information has now been collated by myself and Mr. Schaeffer and published here. As some of these acquistion too place after the BEDT / NYD merger on 1978, this information is published on the New York Dock page as well.

   


return to
Main index
 


Non-Revenue & Miscellaneous Equipment Roster & Photos

   You will notice the unusual equipment at the top of the following list. These items (including the horse) are listed on a 1927 ICC valuation report.

car # description service dates
horse (the hay eating kind!)
work equipment, floating stage, built 1916
work equipment, floating pontoon, built 1916
Ford truck, 1 ton, built 1918
Ford touring car, built 1919
dump cart, 2 wheel, dump body, 2 cu yd cap. ca. 1927
truck mounted crane(s) 1950's-1980's
X6 tank car ca. 1930's - ?
X7 tank car ca. 1940's
X11 tank car ca. 1964 - 1983?
X12 tank car ca. 1950's - ?
X11 derrick car ca. 1970's - 1973?
X14 idler / reach Car ca. 1963 - ca. 1965
wood boxcar (tool car) ca. 1960's
bicentennial boxcar 1976 - 1997
N5 type caboose ca.1972 - 1983


   With the exception of the N5 Type caboose which is currently painted blue and located at the Bush Terminal Yard of NYNJ Rail Corp in Brooklyn; and BEDT #25 (in New York Central livery), it is understood than no other pieces of BEDT Non-Revenue Equipment equipment survive.


   According to Benjamin W. Schaffer, the caboose was purchased from New York Dock and was one of a group of three cabooses purchased by New York Dock from Penn Central circa 1968. It is understood to have suffered a minor fire but when exactly is unknown. During tenure at New York Dock, it is unknown if it was used. If one takes notice, the caboose is first seen at BEDT in the same dark "New York Dock green" with black roof and yellow rungs as C58 above, so it is understood New York Dock at the least, painted the caboose. Due to this, and according to anecdotal information supplied to Benjamin W. Schaeffer, this caboose is almost certainly to have been from the NYD group of three cabooses.


   This caboose still survives and is located in New York New Jersey Rails' Bush Terminal in New York Cross Harbor livery. Its service history throughout the years (after it's service on BEDT) can be read on the New York Dock, New York Cross Harbor and New York New Jersey Rail pages of this website.


   On January 27, 2012, John Taubeneck submitted information on rail cranes located in the New York area. The following entry was noted:

   

   Ohio Locomotive Crane
   c/n 735,
   Model D,
   capactiy: 20 tons
   wheels: 8
   power: steam
   Boom: 40'
   built: September 10, 1912 for Santee River Cypress Lumber Company; Ferguson, SC.
   purchased by Standard Shipbuilding 1916.
   sold to Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal in 1921.
   sold to William P. Gormley, Wilmington, DE; in 1929.
   sold to Lewis Raphaelson, Wilmington, DE, unknown date.

   


return to
Main index
 


Miscellaneous Equipment Footnotes

.

.

Bicentennial Celebration

   In preparation for Operation Sail, and for the celebration of the 200th Anniversary of the United States, BEDT diesel locomotive #25, the tugboats Petro Flame and Petro Arrow, Carfloat #25, along with the steel boxcar (of undetermined origin), would be painted red, white & blue in 1976.

   BEDT #25 would wear her Bicentennial scheme until about 1984, when it was repainted by it's new owners, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad. The tugboats, would wear their Bicentennial dress through their transition into the names "Greenpoint" and "Williamsburgh", and until circa 1978, when both vessels would be repainted and renamed "New Jersey" and "Brooklyn III", which is the time when New York Dock purchased the BEDT equipment & properties.

   The BEDT Bicentennial boxcar retained it's red, white & blue scheme until it presumably scrapped in 2001, as it simply ceased to exist after standing the Greenville, NJ yards for several years.

   As for Carfloat #25, it's disposition in unknown. To the best of our knowledge, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad did not operate Carfloat #25 or any other of BEDT's station carfloats.

   


return to
Main index
 


STEAM LOCOMOTIVES OWNED BY COMPANIES PRIOR TO
THE BROOKLYN EASTERN DISTRICT TERMINAL

.

.

   While this BEDT website entails the detailed history of these steam locomotives after their procurement by BEDT, and while technically two of these companies are not of the New York City area, I still find myself interested in their operations prior to BEDT ownership.

   In the end, I felt and photos taken during their prior employment would be better displayed here than on my Industrial Locomotives of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island & the Bronx website where this chapter was originally located, so I have transferred them to this location.

.
.

I am actively seeking and naturally I will pay a rather handsome finders fee for photographs
pertaining to these locomotives in either their builders photos or photos in pre-BEDT livery.

I am also seeking all information on procurement dates, and subsequent dates of sale.

If you have such photos or information, please contact me at:

.

      As all of the H. K. Porter locomotives owned by the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal would be purchased pre-owned, most of them had one previous owner, except for #16 which had two prior owners before coming to the BEDT. Here is a brief synopsis of those locomotives and their prior owners:

US Navy Fleet Supply Base - South Brooklyn Section - #3
H. K. Porter #6368, 0-6-0T, built March 1919
(BEDT #12)

...

US Navy Fleet Supply Base - South Brooklyn Section - #4
H. K. Porter #6369, 0-6-0T, built March 1919
(BEDT #13)

   

   The US Navy Fleet Supply Base - South Brooklyn Section, purchased two of the BEDT locomotives new from H. K. Porter. These two locomotives were actually part of a four unit order of identical locomotives for the Fleet Supply Base located along Second Avenue between 29th and 33rd Streets in Brooklyn. The two that where sold to the BEDT are #3 and #4, and the disposition of #1 and #2 are unknown.

   It should be noted that these locomotives have been attributed to the Brooklyn Navy Yard, prior to the "discovery" of the Fleet Supply Base on my associated website:

Military Locomotives & Railroads of the New York Metropolitan Area - Fleet Supply Base

   I can only attribute this rather innocent misidentification to the words "Navy" and "Brooklyn" as lettered on the side tank. It was only after I discovered the existence of the US Navy's Fleet Supply Base located along Second Avenue in "South Brooklyn" (the Brooklyn Navy Yard's location can hardly be called South Brooklyn) that the "pieces of the puzzle" came together.

    So with all due respect to previous historians and works about the locomotives, these locomotives never really operated in the Brooklyn Navy Yard!


H. K. Porter builders photo: US Navy Fleet Supply Base, South Brooklyn #3
SMU / DeGolyer Library

   As a footnote, I will also accept photos of the sister locomotives #1 and #2 as there were part of the same order and identical, and I am interested in learning the disposition of #1 and #2.

   An in depth history of the US Navy Fleet Supply Base - South Brooklyn Section and New York Navy Yard; can be viewed on my other website:

Military Locomotives & Railroads of the New York Metropolitan Area

.

.

return to
Main index
 

.

..

.


Mesta Machine Works - #4
H. K. Porter #5966, 0-6-0T, built March 1917
(BEDT 15)

...

Mesta Machine Works - #5
H. K. Porter #6260, 0-6-0T, built August 1920
(BEDT #14)

.
.

   This firm was located in West Homestead, PA. It was a very prominent forging, casting and machining facility, with a capacity to cast and machine very large components. Matter of fact, Mesta was so well respected (it had forged a great deal of military armament for WWII), that when Nikita Krushchev (the Soviet Premier) came to the United States in 1959, he insisted on three destinations: Disneyland, Mesta Machine and meeting John Wayne!

   Pertaining to my interests, Mesta Machine Co. would employ the use of several locomotives over it's history, and had the distinction of owning two locomotives of which would eventually operate for the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal. As I could find no other references or rosters for the Mesta Machine Company, I have complied one here.

loco # builder c/n built wheel arr. model gauge cyl d.d. disposition
2 Baldwin 28460 6/1906 0-4-0T std. 16" x 24" 44"
4 H. K. Porter 5966 3/1917 0-6-0T std. [1] [1] to BEDT #15
5 H. K. Porter 6260 8/1920 0-6-0T std. [1] [1] to BEDT #14, 2/1935
6 H. K. Porter 7203 4/1931 0-6-0F std. 30" x 24" scrapped
7 H. K. Porter 7261 12/1937 0-6-0F std. 30" x 24" scrapped
Whitcomb 12664 8/1928 B 8T CTU 36"
Whitcomb 60300 7/1943 B-B 65DE17A std. to Allegheny Ludlum Steel,
#12; Brackenridge, PA

[1] = see above BEDT chapters for specifications of these locomotives

   As for the two locomotives that were destined to work on the BEDT, Mesta Machine Works had ordered these new from H. K. Porter. The first locomotive, H. K. Porter c/n 5966, was built March 1917. This locomotive would become Mesta Machine Co. #4; and the second locomotive:  H. K. Porter c/n 6260, was built August 1920 and would become Mesta Machine Co. #5.

   After serving for Mesta Machine Company for many years (15 plus years), the locomotives would be sold. As far as can be discerned, on an as yet undiscovered date; the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal purchased Mesta #4 outright as no records of a broker have surfaced to date. This locomotive became BEDT #15 .

   The sale of Mesta #5 however, would be brokered through Birmingham Rail & Loco, of Alabama; and purchased by the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal in February 1935 and this locomotive would become BEDT #14. There is a very strong likelihood this locomotive was purchased first and prior to M. M. Co. #4 (BEDT #15). 

   After many years of searching for photos of the Mesta locomotives without success, I have finally (!!!) located a picture of Mesta Machine Works Co. (MMCo.) locomotive #4 (future BEDT #15). Granted, it is not a roster shot, and it is not a typical working shot, but considering this is the only photo I have been able to locate, I feel it is more than worth sharing and as beggars can't be choosers!

   While the cab is not viewable, this locomotive is undoubtably #4, as the photo was taken in February 1918, one year after MMCo #4 (H.K. Porter c/n 5966) was constructed, and as MMCo. #5 was not constructed until 1920. The sand and steam domes are unmistakably H. K. Porter style as well.


"Exterior of the Mesta with Travelling Cranes, February 11, 1918"
photo courtesy of Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania
Mesta Machine Company collection

.
.

   Of particular note is the kerosene headlamp and air pump. Once at BEDT, the headlamp would be changed to an electric model, and the air pump removed, as BEDT did not utilize air brakes.

.

.

return to
Main index
 

.

.


Astoria Light, Heat & Power - #5
H. K. Porter #6780, 0-6-0T, built January 1923
(BEDT #16)

.
.

   Astoria Light, Heat and Power was the first owner for BEDT 16, and purchased H. K. Porter #6780 new. This firm was located in Astoria, Queens, and manufactured illuminating gas from coal.

   Astoria Light, Heat & Power owned many steam locomotives over its history, and in rather close proximity to Brooklyn, but oddly only one would become a BEDT locomotive, that being BEDT #16.

   Only one picture has been found to date, and appears to be a builders photo from H. K. Porter. It is from the A. C. Kalmbach Memorial Library, Kentlein Porter collection:

.

..
.

   Fleischmanns Transportation - (number unknown)
(BEDT #16)

.
.

   This company, the manufacturer of Fleischmanns's Yeast, was originally located in Peekskill, NY; and was a subsidiary of Standard Brands Foods. This firm was the second owner of H. K. Porter #6780.

   After this locomotive served Astoria Light Heat & Power, it made its way to Fleischmanns Transportation in Peekskill, NY. After serving here for an as yet undetermined period of time, it's sale was brokered through Birmingham Rail & Loco of Alabama, to Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal, to become BEDT #16. I find it extremely unlikely that the locomotive was shipped to Alabama, only to be shipped back to New York, so it all likelihood it remained in New York until its sale to the BEDT.

    No data whatsoever of it sale by Astoria Light, Heat & Power to Fleischmanns Transportation seems to exist. We only know that this locomotive came to the BEDT in 1939. I would very much like to locate information pertaining to the date of procurement for Fleischmanns Yeast of this locomotive, as well as any photographs of this locomotive in Fleischmanns Transportation livery, as none have surfaced to date.

   


return to
Main index
 


[Image]

.
[Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] [Image]

.


(Main Page)

viewing
Rosters


(Property)

BEDT
MEMORABILIA



TrainWeb.org Facebook Page